Candice Malcolm: Media Bias in Canadian Politics| EP35

Candice Malcolm: Media Bias in Canadian Politics| EP35

[Music] hi candace nice to see you thanks for coming on yeah great uh great to be here thanks so much for selecting me i feel honored to join this podcast well it’s a real pleasure meeting you and there’s a number of things i want to get into with you but um maybe for some of my listeners that might not know exactly who you are could you give us the skinny on your background and how you got into doing what you’re doing today yeah sure so i am from vancouver i i told you in the pre-interview that i’m a west coast girl but i uh ended up my career took me to first ottawa and then toronto so um i worked at sun news network back in the day and um have been writing in the toronto sun for almost a decade now which seems crazy but i write i used to write two or three columns a week now i’m doing one column a week because i’ve also started my own digital media platform called truenorth the website’s tnc.news you might have seen it and yeah the whole idea behind true north is that we tell the other side of the story we do fact-based reporting so we kind of go out there look at the data look at the numbers and try to tell the other side of the story that’s being ignored we have a conservative editorial position which is really rare in this country you know there’s there’s sort of a lot of media outlets that sort of traditionally maybe were center-right or centrist which would feel center right in the canadian climate but there really isn’t any media company out there that is willing to articulate and defend conservative principles and ideas and so i sort of saw a need for that and an opportunity and so true north is is doing our best to try to fill that void so you know you see a lot of different products on our platform we do podcasts we do long-form interviews we do research based uh we also just have a straight news section which i’m focused on trying to grow because i think that’s also really needed in the canadian environment so so yeah it’s sort of a a one-stop shop for all the different sort of media digital media needs that you might have and right now we’re sort of interested in gearing up towards a potential election that may or may not be happening in the next few weeks but yeah so so that’s me i’m a journalist i’m a mother of two um and yeah um i don’t know if i missed anything but i’m happy to answer any other specific questions if you want to know about my background or my career no i’m just curious like what got you into politics because like a lot of times when people are growing up as they say you know politics isn’t really the avenue that one sees themselves in especially you know the level that you’re at like you’re really observing analyzing and commentating on like almost everything that goes on in canadian politics especially at the national level so like what what sort of fed that interest out of curiosity yeah it’s interesting because i was super apolitical as a kid like a lot of the people that you know you see they’re like lifelong news junkies or politics junkies i was like i was like a hockey junkie and like i was obsessed with ice hockey and music i was really into those two things when i was in you know growing up in high school and it really wasn’t until i got to university that i started even exploring politics and i i think that this is a problem that so many people have that sort of grow up being a political or apathetic is that politics is like so intimidating because there’s so much that you don’t know and so the first little while is just like you don’t even have an opinion right you or i didn’t anyway i just i felt like i had so much to learn so much to catch up on meeting other people my age that were like political like junkies or politicos and i just i did i didn’t know the basics i actually like almost embarrassed by how naive i was i wouldn’t have been able to tell you like who the premier was i would have probably been able to tell you what the premier what like what that even meant right but yeah it was really through my experiences in university um it just felt like you know i kind of gravitated towards that i’ve always been a pretty patriotic canadian and so i love canada i i told you in the pre-interview as well i’ve got some family in the u.s so you’re interested in the differences between countries i did a overseas exchange program where i went to germany when i was in high school so that probably also um you know got the ball rolling in terms of like just patriotism and like being knowledgeable about canada but then yeah it turned into into politics and political and i actually started out being on the left side of the spectrum like i was a a college lefty for sure and uh were we all yeah i i felt like you know there were so many injustices and i didn’t i didn’t really understand economics so to me it was like why don’t we just solve all these problems like we have the capacity to solve all these problems and to me like the problems that i saw in vancouver were like you know homelessness drug addiction um these kind of problems and and it was just a matter of like will like why wouldn’t you just spend more to fix those problems and i i i think again it was like kind of naivety that that led me to those positions and so i kind of got like i don’t know what it was i i can’t even really say when i had a change of heart but i would say by the time i was done university and leaving i was like an ardent libertarian i was i was really anti-government anti-state um and believed in like really open free markets free society very very limited government um and and then i kind of got into sort of more doing more like research and academic stuff i went and got master’s degrees i worked at a couple different think tanks i spent some time in washington dc and my sort of career trajectory was going more towards like academia maybe doing a phd or working in public policy at a think tank and then i kind of like just by chance i ended up um you know going working in politics in canada and i started out working for danielle smith because uh i was a libertarian and she was like you know the most libertarian politician i’d ever you know seen in canada and i was interested in that i have to have some friends that were involved in the campaign so i moved to alberta worked there for not very long and then the conservatives won the 2011 majority election and i ended up getting a job in jason kenny’s office as his press secretary and that was sort of my first taste of like doing media stuff because um you know i i used to write op-eds every now and then and i submit columns and stuff to my new college newspapers but um it was really interacting with the media on the government side that got me really interested in journalism and so i didn’t i didn’t last very long in government i only worked for kenny for about 10 months and then i moved on to working in the media which is when when i got to sun news so so really i kind of eased into it but i i got a lot of exposure um you know both as sort of someone who’s apolitical and apathetic growing up i know how you know those people think and why they don’t care about politics because that’s how i thought and then as far as liberals i kind of understand how liberals think too because i had that mindset when i was in university and i totally understand and i think a lot of the arguments that they make are really fair and really good um and and and i can also see how they’re flawed and then you know moving into the more kind of conservative or libertarian space um maybe you really need to know how to articulate yourself and and your values and your ideas because you know as a conservative in grad school particularly like you’re in the very very small minority so you have to be able to defend your ideas at all times and i’m pretty outspoken so i would you know defend my ideas and get into debates with lots of different people i think that was like a good experience for me as well so so you know i think all those experiences kind of led me to be able to be like a political junkie that’s like really interested in every new story and trying my very best to at least um you know have like articulate the conservative worldview or at least expose people to ideas that are counter to the liberal worldview so when you kind of left the left let’s say for lack of a better word when you were making her way through university was it that sort of like where like left-wing ideology or political philosophy comes from does it necessarily coincide with your world view is that like something that you’re beginning to learn or was there i mean you kind of said that there wasn’t a definitive moment but do you remember like i really don’t agree with x for instance yeah i’m trying to think back to like exactly how it might have gone down and i i think uh honestly i i feel like the left-wing world view was making me miserable like i was like i’m the kind of person i kind of a true believer right so i i was like i’m studying marks and i was really down about like you know capitalism and these oppressive forces in society and you really feel like the world is stacked against you and as a woman too it’s like you know oh i don’t have the same opportunities that my brothers have and you know that we live i was i was in university before the whole like move towards like everything’s a patriarchy and we live in a rape culture i never i never believed that but i did believe that women were like disadvantaged and i just you know all of these things that you’re kind of taught to believe it didn’t really align with my experiences and like what i observed in the world and what i saw in the world and like how it was like wait a minute why am i being told in university that as a woman i’m oppressed when you know my experiences growing up and what i was always told from my parents and like you know society in general were that you know girls are amazing and women can do anything and you can you know you ha there’s no glass ceilings and you can do anything to be anything and like i kind of lived that like i played ice hockey and i was the first girl in my league and i played with the boys and i was like determined to be able to keep up with them and to play in that league for as long as i could and you know all of a sudden it’s like oh you’re a feminist you know you’re a woman you’re oppressed it’s you just didn’t align it maybe you’re right didn’t align with my worldview like my experiences were so different it was making me kind of miserable and then i i think i kind of felt like um and and also just for more context like you know this is during the iraq war and the bush presidency like i kind of thought conservatives were stupid right the the way that the media portrayed conservatives was like these people are redneck hicks and they’re stupid and the reason that they vote this way is because they’re racist or whatever and i i never really bought into that but like an element of it i thought like you know if you’re a smart person you should be a liberal um and then it was again through like political science classes at the university of alberta that i realized you know most smart people the average smart person is liberal in university but they’re really smart people like the most intelligent people are the conservatives because they’re the ones that are like you know cutting against what the professors are teaching cutting against what the the sort of group think was and i i kind of like went down a rabbit hole and just like reading libertarian thinkers and got like really kind of hooked on the idea of like free markets individual liberty like human empowerment like like if you want to have an impact in the world or you want to be successful and you want to have a good life that’s up to you like it’s it’s you know it’s not incumbent on anyone else to create a life for you that will be you know meaningful and have joy and happiness or whatever you want to accomplish like it’s up to you and i thought that was like so empowering just on a personal level um that it was like okay you know all we need to do to lift people out of poverty and to help people that are homeless or drug addicted they need to feel a sense of empowerment that they can do it it’s not it’s not the government it’s not the government’s fault and it’s not the government’s job to help you it’s your job to help yourself so i i kind of came to that realization and i think it just worked better and i understood it better and it made me like a happier more ambitious person and it’s a bit more logical too it’s an interesting connection that you kind of make to the like you know the likes really really thought out people that you found to be more conservative i sort of find that with uh religious people that i speak with like some of the stupidest people i’ve ever met in my life are religious and yet the smartest people i’ve ever met in my life are also religious right and they’re like really thought out and i think you know if we not that being conservative means you’re religious by any stretch of the imagination but like if you just take that context right it’s like to be on the left one of the things that i found when i was in university and did some graduate work and stuff like that was it was very easy i found to make the left-wing arguments on a lot of things right because you know just at surface value like it’s self-evidently the case that what they’re saying is true there are these injustice injustices x y and z right however to make the more conservative argument and do it like in a sophisticated manner you have to know so much more and be like so much so um much of a deeper reader i think like more of an analytical reader and you have to have like a way way wider of an understanding of like things like political philosophy and stuff like that at least this is my opinion i don’t know if you think that that’s yeah no i think i think again i don’t want to like do my own horn or anything because i think there’s really smart people on both sides of course yeah but but yeah like the the liberal world view is sped like spoon fed to you through the media so you know if you want to um you know know what the like correct way of thinking is just you know pick up turn on cnn for a minute or you know they’ll tell you whereas if you want to get to the conservative position you have to understand the liberal position and then understand the flaws in it so in some ways yes it’s harder and it requires more uh critical thinking and i mean that my experience in university again was that if you were a conservative and you were willing to defend your ideas you had to be well equipped and and you know there usually was some deep philosophical reason why someone would have been a conservative it wasn’t just like you know i’m in alberta so i’m a conservative those people don’t really speak out in school like in university seminars or whatever the people who did were like you know the people who read burke and the people who understood you know the tradition of liberty and history much better than the sort of paint by numbers liberal lefties that it’s like i can i can i can guess what position they’re going to take like i don’t even need to hear them make the i don’t need to hear justin trudeau explain his position i can i can tell you which position he’s going to take on every single issue beforehand because it’s like you know it’s just a paint by numbers sort of leftist mentality and it’s interesting that you mentioned burke i would like just my own thought process nowadays and you know i’m definitely not the first one to coin this and it certainly won’t be the last but like an actual observation is that does in canada like our left-wing parties or liberal party even represent liberalism right because when i was growing up the kind of values that i held and like things that i learned from my reading of political philosophy that would make one a liberal they don’t really seem to be connected to that party so i guess a better question for you is what does conservatism mean for you now in the canadian context well that’s tough because i feel like the conservative political parties don’t do a very good job in representing conservatism either um but but i mean certainly like i i used to just go back to the first point you were making about the liberals not representing liberalism like i i used to really resist the term conservative because i just didn’t feel like it represented me i felt like i was a liberal like i was like a john locke liberal i believe as principles of like you know and again like kind of going to like js mills harm principle like really like an open idea of society like free trade free expression you know all these endless freedoms and i think that no of course not like like the thing that sort of drives me crazy is like you know you have liberals up there saying uh on the issue of abortion right they say you know my body my choice um i’m pro-choice and pro-choice to use this euphemism um but then it’s like are you really pro-choice because you’re not pro-choice about any other aspect of our lives especially when it comes to health care like you’re not for me having the choice to get a second opinion or to pay to skip a queue or to have the option to go and get something done quicker privately like they’re not for any of those kinds of choices so just for this one bumper sticker kind of slogan pro choice it’s like okay whatever um and and and then i think that recently the the ideas behind conservatism like i would still have considered myself a libertarian at least on economic issues and then more probably a social conservative on like personal cultural issues just in terms of like um you know i believe in strong families i believe that families are like the central institution society the most important institutions and that um you need strong families and strong communities to have a strong civil society and a strong a strong country um and and and i kind of reject the the sort of superficial media idea that being social conservative boils down to like two things being anti-gay marriage and being anti um or or i guess being yeah anti-abortion um i i think that you know to me my understanding social conservatism is more you know family-centered and community-centered um i think that to me being conservative in canada is understanding that um it’s not just freedom like it’s interesting that you have two parties the liberals and the conservatives that both kind of talk a good game about freedom they both believe in you know the liberals you hear a lot about the charter charter rights and freedoms um and trudeau said a thousand times that his party is a party of the the charter and that they you know you know when it comes to revoking terrorist citizenships like they’re gonna wave that chart around and say like we believe in in these freedoms um whereas you know one of the probably most used term in a conservative um some speech is the word freedom that’s that’s what they talk about i think when justin trudeau was talking about diversity as our strength uh andershire came back and said freedom is our strength so it’s like you have two parties that both promote freedom and i think this is something that uh jordan peterson really does a really good job on and kind of opened my eyes to it it’s like you know there’s two sides to that coin right there’s the rights and the responsibilities and we never talk about the responsibilities we never talk about your duty we never talk about like what you have to do to be a good citizen and and live in a society live in a functioning society and i think that conservatives need to do a much better job bringing these kind of conversations to the forefront so i think to me like a a conservative would be someone who um is cautious of any kind of like social trend and social movement that’s going to rapidly change something they look at the underlying institutions and say why are these here um before just you know pulling them off and getting rid of them um you know someone who values that sort of stability and order um not just liberty obviously being pro freedom free markets for you know freedom in terms of your ability to choose what vocation you want to have and what kind of life you want to have your ability to live where you want to live your ability to have the kind of family that you don’t that you want or or not um you know the ability to to just live your life and i’ve traveled a lot i’ve lived in a lot of different countries and um you know most most most parts of the world don’t have that kind of basic freedoms like the freedom to choose what you want to do for a living um those are the kind of freedoms that we really take for granted in canada but i think that you know instead of just every party kind of trying to outdo themselves by who’s more for freedom i think we would be better served in our politics if we had one party that talked a little bit more about the the other side of the coin which is like i said the responsibilities um and what you can do um to improve the society you live in not just what what can the government do for me so it’s an interesting point you raise the one that jordan peterson kind of cracks up on over and over again which i think is completely accurate the rights first responsibility metric right and why do you think it is that the conservative parties here in canada haven’t sort of honed in on that messaging right because if you listen to what he’s saying people are essentially starving for the responsibility element of that message right and if that is the case that means there’s an entire like cohort of election voters who are sitting in the center and center left who are susceptible because they actually believe in the fact that responsibility is paramount to one’s life so why do you think it is that conservative parties haven’t sort of grasped this it’s not like they don’t have you know little minions running around who are listening to this that can’t report back in strategy sessions i would imagine yeah and it’s not just like peterson’s message it’s like the proof is in the pudding look at how popular this guy is like look at how incredible you know the reach that he has how many people go to his shows buy his books listen to his podcast like you can you can see it like this this guy’s on to something right and yeah i think that part of the problem in canada with the conservative party is that i mean there’s a lot of problems with the conservative party but that they’re sort of lost at this moment like i don’t really think that they know what they stand for what differentiates themselves from the liberals like you know stephen harper found this sort of amazing uh formula that worked and he was able to unite the sort of various fractions on the right the the free market crowd the christians the you know um people in the gta new canadians he had this really incredible coalition and i i you know stephen harper’s a brilliant man and the strategy behind it is is something that’s amazing and i feel like for the last 10 years or i guess it hasn’t been 10 years since 2015 when they lost so i guess it’s been six years um you know we basically just have different conservative leaders trying to bring back that glory and trying to like you know acting as if we’re still living in 2011. that’s ten years ago um we’re still living in 2011 when when the conservatives last time they won an election federally and instead of sort of looking around seeing the world changing trying to understand that um the base the basis of their message remains the same now i think i’ll cut aaron o’toole some some slack and i’ll give him some credit because i do think he understands this and um unlike andershire who was really squirmish when it came to talking about populism didn’t really want anything to do with trump didn’t want his image to be anything trump-like and really kind of pushed away at that um i feel like aaron o’toole’s a little bit more open to saying like yeah i i want to appeal to blue-collar working-class voters just like just like donald trump did and just like people who voted for brexit and just like um boris johnson’s coalition in the uk and so you know at least he’s sort of open to that idea um whether or not he’s actually able to follow through on that i think it’s another story and i i so far um i mean i mean it’s hard to say and you have to trust the polls in order to say that he hasn’t connected with those voters and maybe he is and maybe he will during a campaign but at this point i don’t feel like the message geared towards connecting to those voters is really strong enough to have actually had it had an impact at this point yeah i’ve uh been railing on this point for a while now there’s a couple people i’ve been in conversation with who kind of say the same thing about the conservative party’s identity crisis uh identity crisis for lack of a better word it’s almost like they don’t know exactly who they are or fully what they stand for and it seems to me that in some respects they they feel the need to capture some of the left-wing vote through like adhering to like left-wing ideas right to i guess so they don’t get painted in a box and criticized because i think what is it the last 70 out of 100 years the liberal party’s been in power so i’m just a question for you like harper’s success do you think that was a success of the conservative party and harper at the time or more of a failure of the liberal party and kind of the electric just being tired of so many years of liberal power and scandal and this was you know all the stars kind of aligned and there was no real great ingenuity behind the movement and the reason why people got in line is because success was there for the taking and they knew it was sort of required of them yeah no i think it’s definitely both right like again i was pretty apolitical uh during the this time in the early 2000s and 90s and early 2000s i know my father who uh is pretty middle of the line like i don’t think he would describe himself as little or conservative but he hated jean-claude cheney just because of corruption and he just felt like the liberals were arrogant and entitled and corrupt and uh which is probably true and i think that for stephen harper he was like in the right place at the right time with the tenacity with the confidence and really you know so much of politics is just showing up so much of it is just being brave enough to you know put your ideas out there stand up there i give stephen harper so much credit um you know like he he he was called all kinds of things he was called an extremist he was called all this thing and he managed to very skillfully you know unite these these fractured parties and put together a united front you know against um paul martin who you know wasn’t as popular as cretchen and liberals had their own internal divides going on um around that time but you know he he lost the 2004 election but he reduced the liberals to a minority and instead of stepping down like andershire did he stuck around and by the time 2006 rolled around he had name recognition he was seen as like a steady stable hand he’s an economist he he seemed like you know this this government is in scandals and you know we need something else and stephen harper presented himself as a very reasonable alternative and i think that the fact that he you know tie that together the fact that they they were able to win seats in quebec and win all these seats in the gta i mean really he did something right and i think that um just as much as it was a reflection on on stephen harper and his brilliance you have to also look at again the stars aligning your point there you had michael ignacio well first he had stefan dion who was just a terrible communicator a terrible candidate and then he had michael ignacief who so many liberals believed was this like you know second incarnation of pierre trudeau right like i remember i was in university this time and the liberals on my campus were we’re calling it iggy mania which you know if you’ve ever been in a room with mike like that you have like i i said international relations i think he’s brilliant as well and i really appreciate his contributions to political thought but you know there’s there’s no achy mania right the guy he’s better in book form yeah yeah exactly and uh you know and then on top of that you had jack leighton who was really popular and not just popular but really popular in quebec and so you had the sort of fall of the block party the rise of jack layton’s ndp um you had a really dud candidate in in michael ignatieff and i think that it was all those things that factored into harper being able to win his majority and i think that it’s such a big mistake for conservatives to just go back to that one you know 2011 election and try to recreate it and try to recreate it over and over again it’s like that’s not going to work because first of all you have trudeau who’s really actually a popular guy and middle of the road canadians like him you know for all his faults they find him likable he’s a nice guy um you have doug meet singh leading the ndp and people don’t really like him they don’t really connect with him they don’t really get him he kind of comes across as arrogant and and like a you know a snobby torontonian who doesn’t really connect with the sort of traditional blue-collar base of the ndp um and you know you’re not going to have that same luck that you had in in terms of the stars lining in 2011. yeah that’s a good point and trudeau for all his faults which are are many um he also has a thought out world view even i know some conservatives might disagree with that or get get upset about that like he i believe that he or the people around him at the very least have a clear vision of what they think the world should look like or what canada should be now whether you agree with that or not i mean i happen to not agree with that is entirely beside the point but i think the point is when people look at him who are sort of the the type of people that you just mentioned that would support him they kind of like understand what they’re getting and they believe he knows where he’s going whereas like one of my criticisms on the conservative side of things has been it almost seems directionless in terms of a grand vision for canada and my friend irvin student pointed this out to me once he said look like people don’t go to bed at night putting their head on the pillow dreaming about balanced budgets and fiscal responsibility as logical as that may seem right they want something to grab onto like something they can dream about like something that their children can aspire to and like conservatives don’t have this vision and i think a lot of what’s missing is something that you sort of captured that whole responsibility element at least that’s that’s the way i see it yeah i think that’s true in a in a party sense i mean i i sort of surround myself with um you know kind of bigger thinkers as well and i think there are plenty of them in the in the conservative movement um i i say i surround myself are you familiar with civitas no okay i’m going to get you to join so it’s it’s a ideas society for classical liberal conservative libertarian people in canada so it’s a group of academics journalists think tank people business people it was founded 25 years ago and the idea at that point was to unite the rights so so a lot of the sort of big players in the in the early days like i’m talking about like tom flanagan stephen harper jason kenny ezra levant um david frum they were all kind of the founders of this organization and the idea was just to get all these conservatives in a room together once a year to like duke it out and have a battle of ideas and the conference kind of maintained so it’s a it’s open anyone anyone can join and basically what we do is just like once a year we host a big conference where we just talk about like all the conservative ideas and we get into debates and stuff like that and so i think within the conservative ideas world there’s plenty of really kind of like big visions for what canada could be i know um um brian lee crowley put out a book called the canadian century and i was talking about how wilford laurier had said that the 19th century belonged to the united states but the 20th century would belong to canada and he was obviously wrong about that but they kind of said what about the 21st century the 21st century could could belong to canada i know like um conrad black writes about this a lot about how like the the idea of what canada could be like canada could still be a great country it’s hard for us because we live in the shadow of the you know probably the greatest force for human freedom in in history and we sort of live in the shadows and so much of what canadian identity is now is you know how we’re different from the us how we’re different from our american neighbors and in some ways that’s kind of a sad lonely existence like you know um the sort of post-war um vision of canada and canadian nationalism is based on this like you know we’re like a kinder gentler more progressive version of our american neighbors which is isn’t much of an identity i think that canada could still create an an idea or at least that’s what some of these people that have mentioned put forth this idea that canada could you know be a serious um superpower in the world you know just through promoting basic liberal democracy and that could be sort of like the thing that we that we do um and you know we say that trudeau has like a thorough um world view i i i just find it so sad that that’s a world where i think back of christian freeland’s um speech that she was sort of lauded for in the media about how canada is this like stable middle power and it’s like you know trudeau thinks that canada is a post-national state like how are these things that you can get excited about it’s also so depressing it’s like we’re not we’re not really a real country we don’t have any identity we don’t have anything that binds us together oh and we’re just like a middle power like it’s like man like how depressing there’s you know what there’s so much there just do you i guess one of the things i’ll ask you is do you think that sort of post-nationalism is the logical endpoint of sort of the liberal universalism of somebody like pierre elliott trudeau i mean it’s it’s sad but yeah i think that’s part of the reason why i have so much you know so many areas where i would critique this sort of multicultural worldview it’s like if you don’t have anything that binds you together and you don’t stand for anything and the country is just a space where different groups can live side by side in peace like that’s not a sustained recipe for a country it’s not also not a sustained recipe for peace because sooner or later you know these groups are going to bring the tribal hatreds that they had wherever they came from and they’re going to clash here like there’s nothing that that’s specific about canada in our dna that prevents you know old tribal hatreds from spewing up and you and you do see that you see that sadly um you know during the anytime there’s a palace a flare-up between israel and palestine you see people fighting in the streets over it um you see it and this is an area i’ve covered a little bit in my journalism but um the idea of these kalistani radicals these people who want um punjab to separate seek separatists who want to create their own uh basically like an ethno state in india um and you have these these two groups in canada hate each other and you know they haven’t left it behind it’s not like they leave india and they come here and then they’re happy and they live kumbaya it’s like no they hate each other and um you can see it online it’s pretty crazy um so so yeah i think that if your world view is is really that we we’re just this space where people can live side by side it’s like first of all that’s not gonna produce any kind of like that’s not a country right that’s just like a hotel and actually yeah martel said this that canada is the world’s greatest hotel um and to me that’s just so insulting like so deeply insulting that the the idea that you promote about canada on the world stage is that we’re just like this place where you can go and feel comfortable and leave like that there’s nothing there in terms of like an actual identity or a nation and yeah i think i think that the leftist worldview is is doomed to fail and that the leftist um idea of the canadian national project is also doomed to fail just because there’s nothing there’s nothing again they promote it’s all based on we’re not american we’re nicer but also we don’t have anything that we stand for that we believe in it’s just sort of emptiness it is depressing and it is almost like you need a big project to undertake right to have those sort of attachments in the berkey and sense that like kind of bind people together like in countries so you can get things done because if you have this this hotel or like this you know kind of conglomerate of people who like they i don’t know just wear clothes and eat like certain foods but there’s no other real differences or similarities between them right it’s like how do you move forward at the end of the day like in in any meaningful manner and how do you stay together in the long term like does that create a a situation in a sense where in 100 years from now a country like canada could cease to exist if we keep heading down that path which is something like i’ve always wondered like the path of the post-national state absolutely and the whole idea i’m sorry if i cut you off i didn’t go ahead like the idea that again we talked about a little earlier that dustin trudeau you know wraps himself around the charter and he he’s a party of the charter but they don’t even apply the charter within their country and within their worldview i’ll give you an example um you know when when i was working for jason kenney in the immigration department we changed the citizenship guide and one of the things that we included was just like a little blurb that said and the citizenship guide is like a booklet that’s given to all newcomers saying like learn all this stuff and then you’ll have a test about it um if you want to become a canadian citizen and it was like we added one one paragraph that said like barbaric cultural practices including female genital mutilation spousal abuse so-called honor killings um i think i think it was it maybe there was one other example um those practices are not tolerated in canada and at the time justin trudeau was the multicultural critic and he took offense to the language because he didn’t like us calling those practices barbaric he said that that was pejorative and that it could um i don’t know he he he basically just said that that was wrong that the conservatives are using that language and um like again his idea is that if people have those practices like if someone wants to wear a burqa and come to canada like we should celebrate them that’s freedom to him the freedom to them is a woman who is so enslaved in her own personal life and in her family and in her religion that she literally has to wear a black bag over her entire body she can’t even show her fingers or like the like like maybe she has a slit for her eyelid some of them cover that completely um that somehow that’s something that we should celebrate as liberty in this country what about that woman i mean shouldn’t the canadian ideal apply to everyone that you come to canada you get this freedom you have this amazing way of life how come that doesn’t apply to the the wives and daughters of you know these these sort of fundamentalists religious zealots who come to canada and i think it’s a huge contradiction the fact that there are um people practicing fmg female genital mutilation which is just a really disheartening idea that people are doing that in canada and the government doesn’t have any statistics about it um there’s no way nothing that they do to crack down on it we know it’s happening we know it’s a problem we’ve heard people speak out about it the fact that it’s happening in canada and you know when it comes to the politics behind it if you even bring it up you get smeared as a racist or an islamophobe and and that’s the end of it and it’s like well how come the charter doesn’t apply to everyone how come these women don’t have the same protections that i have or you know that canadian women have and again like this is the problem with their worldview it’s like they believe that criticizing other cultures is racist and so they’ll let truly barbaric things happen in the country under the name of promoting liberty and again if you try to criticize it you get called a racist and that that that argument has really stuck because at least in 2011 we saw conservatives willing to push back against it it was actually a pretty good issue for conservatives who were fighting saying no we don’t want women to be able to wear these masks during um citizenship ceremonies and like you know you just kind of hitting back on some of these issues and now you know again 10 years later you have a bunch of those same conservatives those same mps coming out saying like we apologize for those previous remarks we made 10 years ago that was racist of us and we contributed to this um climate of islamophobia in canada which is not true but you know the fact that they concede on that just shows a weakness of conservatives is that they’re so interested in getting the respect and love and admiration of the media which is never going to happen like media is never going to endorse a conservative party like sure maybe the the newspapers will sort of from like an economic corporate perspective but like the columnists and the cultural heart of these journal of journalism are never going to support conservatives so it’s better that conservatives just come to terms with that instead of constantly trying to search for you know the strange new respect of the press yeah because like really they should be making these sort of arguments and bringing them directly to the public like through other sources for example or as directly as they possibly can given the fact that we have a world where almost every politician is on twitter and various other social media platforms like it’s interesting that justin trudeau felt that that it was a pejorative to say you know these sort of barbaric cultural practices are not welcome in canada right like given the fact that it is a country of a rule of law and like every single one of the things you mentioned would like fall outside of that right so and i think that like to some degree do you think that one of the problems is they’re not willing to recognize that there are elements of western culture that are superior like in just in terms of a basic fundamental rights perspective yeah and that’s really interesting because i feel like again like five ten years ago this was a really good issue for conservatives and if you found a conservative politician that was skilled enough to be able to articulate it in a meaningful thoughtful way you know it was a good issue that could really move votes and could kind of win win over middle-of-the-road people who were like yeah of course terrorism is bad yeah it’s terrible that all these isis guys are flooding into europe and murdering people and we should probably be a little more cautious with our immigration program and we should stand up and say let’s defend our values and our principles um instead of you know having this weird moment where anytime there was an islamist um psychopath killing people in the name of his religion we had to do this like weird ceremonial public thing where we we all praised islam and we all like you know talked about how great mosques were in our community or whatever and i i think part of the problem was that there were some major missteps among conservatives again people who don’t do it in a skillful tactful way who aren’t sincere about it who aren’t knowledgeable about it um people who just jump up and say like you know the conservatives um announced in this election that they were going to introduce a barbaric cultural practices hotline um you know what what they did is they took that wedge issue that they used to that they had used to kind of burn trudeau um when he said that it was pejorative to to describe honor killings as barbaric like give me a break a guy murdering his daughters because they have western boyfriends you’re murdering them and you’re not even able to condemn that as barbaric like give me a break so they took this issue that was good for conservatives and then they kind of jumped the shark like they just like no tact absolutely no nuance a big billboard like you know let’s ban barbaric culture practices and they just really screwed it up but i think kelly leach’s leadership campaign in 2016 um was also sort of the essence of this of like taking issues that a lot of canadians just kind of like agreed with instinctually like yeah there should be some kind of a values test on people coming to canada make sure that they actually believe in the canadian ideal that they are here because they support liberal democracy um but instead you know she had this like weird undertone of like you know it allowed the media to paint her as a racist which i don’t think kelly leach is a racist but it allowed her to you know a reasonable person who’s not paying very close attention could draw the conclusion that she had racist motives and um you know it was hard for her to come back against that and i think because of a couple of those instances that happened conservatives just got like so afraid and they allowed the media and the left to kind of win that argument and now they just moved on and now it’s just like one of the 20 things that conservatives can’t talk about because it loses elections and again this is kind of we’re talking about before but conservatives just don’t know who they are and they’re afraid of their own shadow so you know there’s so many issues that they could probably win on if they just bothered to articulate it and explain it and try to win it when canadians over on these ideas but instead it’s like there’s seriously so many issues now that the conservatives just won’t even talk about they won’t talk about health care they won’t talk about pension reform they won’t talk about abortion they won’t talk about now immigration like it’s just like you know there’s just so many issues and and probably they won’t talk about first nations they won’t talk about you know residential schools there’s just so many issues that they just don’t want to talk about because they think they’re gonna lose and they don’t have the confidence to to even try so they just sort of like shrug and say okay we’ll just adopt the liberal position on us and the more they do that the more they push themselves into irrelevancy right because it’s like they’re losing like sort of the cultural battle not necessarily like the the modern cultural wars but like over time they have lost like many like cultural battles right to the point where they’re always having to shift their position further and further away from what many of them believe and that’s not excuse an excuse for like giving up things that like we should have been well over in our society like even before their expiry date but you know to some degree right if they keep doing what they’re doing now it’s like what are what are they going to campaign on like other than fiscal responsibility right because and it’s funny i ran into somebody who’s like a sort of like a fixture in the conservative campaign and i said what’s the thesis like what is the thesis of the campaign because don’t tell me that it’s fiscal responsibility because canadians don’t care about that and trudeau is like sort of proved in one way or another that canadians have an appetite to pile on a ton of debt right like forget about the pandemic that’s besides the point but he ran in 2015 on spending all kinds of money got elected with a majority he ran again on spending money he got elected so where’s the the new plan you know like what else are we going to do and her response to me was well given it’s a pandemic like who are the better managers of of the government in the economy who would you want managing i was just like oh my god like like you’re never going to win are you like once you get to that but that’s your pitch that’s your elevator pitch like hey who do you trust us and and i’m sorry to say but the concerns of their own issues right like it’s not like they’re perfect stewards of of government like they’re they’re human and even if you just look at like you know air no tools you know the last six months he’s gotten busted on a bunch of the same stuff that trudeau did and that he was giving contracts to conservative uh you know um consultants and you know he had this weird spat with peter mckay during leadership about like someone stole someone’s data like you know all the same annoying scandals that canadians roll their eyes over like it’s not really like they have that proposition and so yeah no one wants physical responsibility right now because everyone’s worried about the health care system and so the last thing you want is even to be talking about balancing the budget because then that will get considered into oh they’re going to cut health care they’re going to cut health care which you know if you’re running on a an election platform if we’re going to cut health care which you know as soon as you talk about balancing the budgets and balancing the budget and and um cutting bringing back spending people’s minds go right there and that’s where the attack ads go so again yeah like what then what and what i think i think that’s a great question and i think that it’s it’s too bad because i you know i think a lot about big policy ideas and what you know what what the conservatives should be talking about what what is out there that that would be available and the beauty of canada is that we’re a relatively small country um we can implement vast policies like the prime minister has incredible control in this country it’s not like the president united states who you know the whole system was designed for um you know not being able to get stuff done for a constant constant gridlock and you know in canada it’s the opposite so you could actually propose big new ideas and i i think that’s part of the reason why justin trudeau won as well because you know he was seen as as young and inexperienced and everyone knew that he didn’t really have a real meaningful career they didn’t really done much with his life um you know he hit 40 and decided he want to be prime minister and like you know by age 42 he was prime minister which is pretty remarkable achievement but uh but yeah like you know he he was kind of thinking outside the box he he was calling for electoral reform he was calling for marijuana legalization he was calling for um changing up the senate like you know just a couple things even even the idea that he wasn’t going to balance the budget was at the time seen as like oh this guy is really like outside a step with um where the country is at and it was like you know he just you know he he had he had kind of a vision for the country like you said earlier and i think a lot of canadians like that i know my my grandmother loves trudeau and uh you know i think to her it’s just like she she knows that pierre trudeau was really thoughtful really intelligent really you know had this grand vision for for canada and so like his son must have like some of his dna like he must have the same even if we can’t see it it must be there right and and in the meantime he’s just like kind of this nice guy that people trust and they like and you know um i i don’t agree with any of this stuff just just just so we’re clear i can’t stand i can’t stand listening to him i find that every word he says every sentence he says is just so cringe-worthy i i don’t believe anything he says i find the way that he delivers things the way he talks to canadians so condescending and so inauthentic um that it really i find him cringy and you know i i just don’t see him the same way as as most of the country does and it’s surprising that well i shouldn’t say most i think he wins with like you know 30 30 some percent of voters so that’s like a smaller fraction of the canadian population but but yeah they they obviously see something um that that i don’t and i think it’s important in politics to try to understand you know the strengths and the weaknesses of the people that you opposed that’s a good point because i i actually like the the line about the cringe worthy because it almost seems like it’s uh like he’s delivering a lion of poetry when he’s saying the most simple simple thing he could be saying you know like today there was uh congestion on the 427 and it would be delivered like today there was congestion you know it’s like oh my god can you just like speak the sentence like a human being yeah yeah exactly so what do you think it is about the media that loves to criticize conservatives no matter what they do and what do you also think it is about conservatives that they can’t have or they they’ve yet to come up with like post harper a messenger for a lot of these things that is tactful that has like a way of communicating nuanced ideas in a way that doesn’t leave them open to be labeled a racist or you know kind of persona non-grata but i mean it’s interesting because i’ve seen you be labeled such things um for some of your commentary and i’ve read a lot of your commentary and i don’t you know i’m speaking with you now i don’t know you that well but you seem like a very reasonable person who isn’t uh you know like the head of a racist gang or anything like that so like why do these accusations come out in your opinion well look i i just think that it’s it’s easy for the left to spin also the the words have changed like the meaning of the word racist it used to really mean something it used to be one of like the harshest things that you could deliver against a person calling them racist meant that you know it could be devastating for someone and it still sort of is but something weird happened in i think it was around 2015 that’s what happened to me anyway that the left the media the liberals they just started conflating um any criticism of open border immigration not just not just immigration but open border immigration um they they conflated that with with being racist and so the first few times i was called a racist for something it was like well what do you mean i’m not talking about race i’m not disparaging any group i’m not you know um being ignorant i’m not i’m not like any of the sort of things that you would think define the word racism i was like i’m not doing that so what is it and then i kind of realized like wow so many conservatives get called racists for this stuff and i kind of i’m like an avatar for that because all of a sudden i see these like play wars playing out on my twitter feed and it’s like um you know someone high profile calls me racist and i have like a thousand people defending me and it’s like you know they they get it because they they’re called that too and then and someone call me racist like calling all of them racist and it’s like well shouldn’t talk about race not talking about race at all and even immigration like i’m not even a close border type like i think that immigration is great and i think it’s good and i think it’s part of canada’s identity um but there’s a couple like factors that play into it which is that like you know we have laws and laws should be enforced and you know if you don’t enforce your immigration laws and there’s no point in having them um and also that integration is important so you can’t just like open the floodgates let a bunch of people in and then say like welcome to canada have a great time like no you have to help them succeed in this country you have to teach them what it means to be canadian you have to give them these skills and then this foundation and so i know it’s a bit of a tangent but but the idea is that like i i can defend my ideas and my views so it is almost like water off a duck’s back at this point it’s like if you’re calling me racist because you’re and you’re ignorant you’re an or you know you’ve got an axe to grind and that’s not my problem that’s your problem right it’s like you know and and i think part of the problem is that we don’t have the conservative we don’t have as many you know people in political positions that take that mentality that like i can defend myself so like you can call me something and that’s okay that’s your problem again you know the stakes are a lot higher if you’re in partisan politics because you’re trying to win elections and you know that that title racist could be pretty devastating whereas again for me it’s like it makes my audience like me even more because i guess it’s like relatable to them or whatever and i i still adamantly defend any accusations of racism and it’s never written in any like real publication it’s just like idiots on twitter saying it right or trying to create a a stir um but you know you know i think that when it comes to conservatives in in leadership positions and partisan politics it’s like it takes a lot of like duking it out in order to be successful and i think again part of the problem is that we haven’t had a long-standing leader like i think that andershire had a lot of potential there was a lot of things about him that didn’t work and that he wasn’t very good at and that he just lacked the skill set but he also had a lot of other really good things going for him um he was great in the house of commons he’s really articulate he had like a great line of defense um and and a great ability to kind of like deliver these zing one-liners um that are great for clips so he so it plays well on social media um you know stepping back a little bit you know he’s a suburban dad he’s kind of nerdy he’s got this like beautiful family he’s you know he he speaks fluent french he’s he’s a saskatchewan mp but he’s from ontario so he understands like gold person country i think i think sheer had potential that if he had stuck in the game long enough he could have gotten better and potentially given trudeau a real run for his money um in the same way that harper did you know between the 2004 and the 2006 election but you know shear got afraid of his his own shadow and he didn’t like the criticism and he wasn’t willing to fight and he kind of got knifed by like the toronto consultant class the sort of red tory people that didn’t want him there and didn’t like who he was or who he stood for and and like you know he could have fought because i think the base was for him and the conservative party could have fought but he he didn’t and now we’re kind of back to the drawing board with a new guy and it’s like do we give this guy a chance he’s not really doing anything i don’t really know if he’s electable like what’s his strategy what’s his plan what’s he stand for we’re all just kind of waiting around hoping that he does better but i don’t know if you will one thing i was saying like i don’t think like so the conservatives essentially lost that election in ontario and i don’t know how much of that was a consequence of sheer but the severe unpopularity of doug ford’s uh pc party in the first term like it’s been like a a lifetime since then given coveted and everything else but you know you had nothing but criticism like from every single like publicly funded organization or institution that exists in ontario was on them about something like from education to like healthcare mental health like all these different things right and like i think people might have had some sort of buyer’s remorse at least that’s like i have no idea if i’m right about this but it just seems that that’s the case right it’s like how okay like even lisa rate lost her seat right like in 2015 she keeps it and then she loses it you know um just a you look all around the province it’s like okay we picked up seats in other parts of the country but just not here like what what’s the rationale behind that i have a hard time believing it was sheers like quote-unquote social conservatism that cost him the election you know maybe it did like i mean this is this is your world but i i was having this conversation with a friend the other day too like i give canadians a little more credit i know that the media and the liberal party did a real like nasty job on andershire and really really unkind and cruel to him like they did this weird six degrees of separation thing that was like well andrew scheer you had this guy hamish that’s working in your campaign and hamish he used to work at the rebel and the rebel is racist so therefore andrew must be racist and like you know they they were really kind of grasping at straws there but you know it it it was and maybe she didn’t have a good response to it and then same with the whole you know the weird line of attack like do you think um being gay is a sin like that’s that’s sort of like a theological question and and andershire was like totally unprepared to answer that i think a lot of conservatives were offended that he was even asked that but the way that he handled that really just didn’t didn’t really show like a degree of professionalism and confidence in his own opinion so so so yeah i give canadians more credit i don’t think that it was those those few issues that really that really did it for him it’s interesting your point about about doug before because i i know that the sort of like common wisdom in ontario is that like ontario voters are so fair-minded that they’ll always vote one way provincially in a different way federally and if there’s a federal liberal party then they’ll vote conservative nationally and like i i think that’s like a little bit too simplistic as well but um yeah and and i just want to make one other point about that part of the problem with these conservative leaders is that they really at the end of the day they don’t really defend themselves they don’t they don’t stand on their on their they don’t stand their ground and fight back so you have like all of these just crazy wild accusations like oh he’s cutting this and he’s killing people and all this stuff and crazy marches that go on at queen’s park the legislature and in toronto there and you know what you really need is like a conservative leader that’s willing to just call it out and say it’s not true and like you know you see these kind of republican um leaders that do it like you know you see someone like ron desantos just dressing down a reporter saying like what you’re saying right now is not true and here’s the seven reasons i’m gonna explain why and chris christie kind of had that attitude as well where he would just the former governor of new jersey where he would just if a reporter asked him like a bs question he would call him and be like look this this and and then of course trump trump is like the king of that trump is like you know every conservative that feels uh mistreated or unrepresented it’s like trump is like again like i said earlier that i’m like the avatar people trump is like the avatar it’s like yes someone’s finally punching back against these jerks and and calling them out and saying why it’s not true and calling all the hysteria and that that really makes conservatives feel good probably aliens and a lot of people as well but i mean just just a final quick example like look at the us and look at the amount of attention that was on the u.s southern border during trump’s presidency like during those four years it was like non-stop kids in cages like inhumane amnesty international blah blah blah it’s like non-stop nonstop nonstop and then all of a sudden you know joe biden walks in and like the press cover just completely stops like it just we don’t hear anything and then you know you read a statistic i think i think this is right i think i read this the other day that there have been 100 000 arrests on the southern border of the us in 2021 a hundred thousand you know like like wow they are really opening up plugins and where are they housing these hundred thousand people have been arrested probably most of them have been released but the idea is just that like as soon as a democrat’s in office that storyline just stops like we don’t hear anything about it ever and that’s it um and then as soon as a conservative republican’s in office it becomes like the biggest issue that everyone cares about and i think that’s that’s part of the problem with the media it’s just so stacked against conservative ideas and worldview but again i think that conservatives in canada would be better served if they were just willing to push back against the media willing to just be unpopular with a certain class of people like you know the fancy people in downtown toronto are never g
rn

Candice Malcolm: Media Bias in Canadian Politics| EP35

rn

Share this post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *