How The Left SOLD OUT Everyday People

How The Left SOLD OUT Everyday People

what happened to politics you might be asking yourself i remember when there used to be political parties that at least pretended to care about ordinary working people no matter what color they were or what their persuasions were they represented people on the basis of economics if you were the little guy if you were an ordinary american an ordinary brit or an ordinary australian or whatever there was a party for you where did those parties go to what happened to the left where did the left disappear to in this fantastic conversation from my podcast under the skin available on luminary you can get it on apple i talked to jonathan height who’s an expert on these matters a brilliant thinker you’ll know all about him by now you don’t need me to tell you about his credentials look at this fantastic conversation where he talked about the erosion of those principles and how we ended up in a state where no matter who you work for unless you’re a big business you probably aren’t going to get a government that cares about you so it’s it’s kind of stunning that in the united states and in the uk the you know the democratic party and the labor party of course were they were there for the working man they were there for they were focused on class issues um my my grandparents one of my great grandfathers was a labor organizer in new york uh in the shoemaker’s lobby or whatever it was and so you know from the 19th century in the writings of karl marx through the 1950s or up to the 60s the left was focused on you know labor versus capital class issues the working class and that was the that was the you know the bread and butter of the of the party’s support um and then the left is kind of on the on the outs both with thatcher and reagan are very successful in our two countries uh and then center-left politicians clinton and blair kind of reinvent their parties in a more i don’t usually use the word neoliberal but i suppose it is it is appropriate here um they they reinvent them in that way and in part they’re capitalizing on the big switch from the economic left to the sort of the cultural left or the new left in the 1960s and 70s i don’t know about the history in the uk but certainly in the u.s we had the civil rights movement beginning really in the 50s and spectacularly successful in the 60s uh we then get women’s rights gay rights animal rights um you know gay marriage lgbt transgender so we’ve had um uh a real libera i mean it is clearly the left fighting for liberation from oppression but i think they kind of took a wrong turn as they got so focused on quote marginalized groups they began to engage in a lot of symbolic politics still using a kind of a marxist or focusing sort of language and so now it’s you know it’s about things that really turn people off like in the united states for a while it was all about bathrooms and who gets to use which bathrooms when all the while inequality is rising and the working class is doing terribly so you it’s so the left has always been recognizably about power but i think they kind of took their eye off the ball obviously civil rights women’s rights huge successes but you know our countries are now a lot more fair and open but the left is sort of doubling down on these identity issues and they in fact don’t even like certainly the white working class because they think the white working class is racist do you see a corollary between the doubling down on these issues and the migration through politicians such as blair and clinton to a kind of a neo-liberal left that still has the same economic interests and represents the same hegemony that is has traditionally been represented by the right so it’s not a wrong turn it’s just a and it becomes a kind of obviously not diminishing the significance of the something as powerful and profound as the civil rights movements the rise of feminism feminism or trans movements of course i’m not but that i i minded jonathan of something that the gay rights activist peter tattral said to me once he said he when he was like you know campaigning for gay rights in sort of like african countries i think specifically rwanda or whatever and sort of globally too he said that he said the establishment will ultimately always yield on civil rights issues because it does not affect the nucleus of their power which is financial and economic if you start to approach that power basis that nucleus of power they will resist it and so if you when i consider the cultural wars and where it takes place the um the conflict it causes between let’s say the um conventional constituency of leftist parties i.e white working class or white people or people of that class of all colors and the emergent identity groups whose rights necessarily are being promoted of course but these th this is where true alliances all be taking place because they’re powerful remain ultimately unaffected by these transitions whereas there’s this sort of layer of society where there’s all this sort of frankly needless conflict well that’s interesting um we just had martin luther king day here and uh i was you know listening to um listening to his speeches and just thinking back on him and at some point i think it was he who said something about how you know the uh the the granting of civil rights and voting rights was the easy part because that doesn’t really cost anything um the next phase is going to be economic it’s going to it basically it’s going to take billions of dollars and this is going to be much harder and and that is the part that we’re still wrestling with today and the biden administration is is clearly very focused on so i think there is something to the perspective that you give there i would add to it you have to look at coalitions on both sides so uh um you know you know the worst number of political parties to have in any country is one but the second worst number is two because that really creates you know that maximizes the degree to which we do us versus them parliamentary systems have their own problems with stability but they you know if there’s a lot if there’s a bunch of different parties you have to make coalitions it’s not just the world divided evenly in two so uh you know on the right reagan created this coalition that seems a little unnatural but had something in common which was the uh sort of the relig um evangelicals and the religious right um uh sort of nationalists and uh far-right uh more authoritarians and what are sometimes called um uh economic conservatives or laissez-faire conservatives who are not conservative at all they’re what you call in europe liberals or what we call libertarians so the right has those coalitions so you can’t say like the right has this agenda because there’s these three different groups on the left i think we have at least two groups we have the sort of the center left bill clinton uh you know i would put myself largely largely there uh that is not anti-business that generally is pro-business but we you know trying to make it better for the for the working class but um and then you have more the cultural the cultural left which is especially in creative industries in hollywood and universities um which is focused on identity issues so so if we have that map um i you know so tell me your question again we’ll put it in terms of like the two different groups on the left what i’d say is absolutely nowhere on that map is there a group that’s saying if we are to make any meaningful impact on power we have to concentrate on the regulation taxation dismantling and in some cases nationalization of these extremely powerful groups in media in whether that’s new or old media in energy production obviously sort of you know what we’re calling traditional energy and like and i think that this dearth of representation for that particular specific and i would say uh defining problem is what is exacerbating this conflict that the natural constituents of that territory have to reach to to populism on the right as it’s the only thing that’s in any way representing their values come on your parent your grand sisters died in a war this is our flag you know on in both of our countries uh so that’s where i feel the the real problem my late and also i may say in when you said the worst number of parties is one the second worst number is two and like a coalition government it seems to me that the sort of and without getting too much into con i don’t even consider it conspiratorial territory it’s quite clear that there are global interests that are transcendent of national bipartisan politics that are able to maintain their interests pay money to lobby with either party in either of our countries and are broadly speaking free from any threat of their imperatives being pursued and so like those two things no representation to tackle that problem and the reality of that problem is creating a new constituency with no home yes i think that i think that’s a good diagnosis uh in the united states we at least had bernie sanders who was more of a you know old-fashioned uh economic socialism you know very much more the worldview of my grandparents in new york city um and um so the there there certainly are still a very large group on the left that is focused on power and dismantling but because they’re focused on identity it’s about white supremacy or white privilege and so they do want to dismantle but it’s not the powerful interest you’re talking about it’s white people and especially straight white men those are the bad guys and if we all focus on taking down straight white men then the world will be a more just place now this is an ideology that tends to be strongest or i think is rooted in the universities and the elite universities in the united states and we see i think evidence of it in oxford and cambridge as well um uh and and you know people who graduate from harvard and yale tend not to be marxists who want to burn down the economic system they want jobs in consulting companies but they also want to rail against white supremacy which has a very expanded definition you know we used to mean like ku klux klan you think white people are superior and should run the place now it’s if there’s a if there’s a racial imbalance it’s white supremacy you know if the leadership of university if the top three people are white that’s white supremacy so we have this enormous amount of concept creep which then turns most of the country against them so i do think this was a wrong turn for the left or rather the left has weakened itself by embracing identity issues as firmly as it has if you enjoyed that conversation and you found it educational you might want to consider subscribing to my podcast lumery you can get it on apple i have a chat like that every single week plus i do a guided meditation plus dave chappelle’s stuff’s on there as well which is mind-blowing and fantastic and brilliant i love it if you want uh ask me any questions comment below we read these comments we get into this stuff please subscribe to my channel and go over to awakening for more free content if you want to learn something about meditation maybe have a look at that little video if you want to learn a little more about corruption and politics have a look at this little video it’s up to you thank you very much for watching
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How The Left SOLD OUT Everyday People

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