Hurricane Ida Slams Into New Orleans, Tests Levee System

Hurricane Ida Slams Into New Orleans, Tests Levee System

rob there seems to be more hurricanes am i right you are and there’s a reason behind that tom uh the classification for the storms has kind of uh changed a bit over the last 30 years the hurricane center has been naming some storms uh like over the weekend they named julie in the central atlantic that say back in the 80s or 90s wouldn’t have been named as a storm so that’s one of the reasons we’ve seen the number of name storms come up during the season so rob we’ve seen this storm actually hit as a category four and this has been a question about testing the levees that were newly enforced after katrina what do we know in terms of how well they held up how well the protections that were put into place actually succeeded in fortifying the city well lisa the testing is going to continue because the problem is not only the storm surge that accompanied ida as she made her way inland but the problem with katrina back in 2005 in new orleans was not the storm surge it was the rainfall that occurred with katrina going into lake pontchartrain lake pontchartrain coming up in height and then that caused flooding into the city of new orleans that rain is continuing right now with ida flash flood warnings are in effect for southeastern louisiana northeastern louisiana and much of mississippi so we’re going to see that system tested not only today but tomorrow and through the rest of the week as that rainfall works its way into lake pontchartrain from the north shore north of new orleans brings the lake levels up then we’re going to have to see how those levees handle that increased pressure from lake pontchartrain to the north and given the timeline that you just laid out when do we start to get an assessment of the damage the recovery that follows well in regards to the wind damage that’s probably going to take place later today and tomorrow the winds with the system are down from 150 miles an hour yesterday afternoon they’re now 60 miles an hour the storms about 50 miles north northeast of baton rouge so as the winds diminish the power line crews can get out there they’ll assess how long it’s going to take to restore power from what i can understand in some of the reports there’s been some transmission damage to the city of new orleans so that’s going to take time to replace but in regards to some of the other damage in regards to water runoff flash flooding that type of stuff that’s probably going to continue right on into wednesday and thursday rob carroll and anthony emails in thanks for listening to us on bloomberg radio from sparta new jersey anthony and rob carolyn he says he’s driving from philadelphia to nashville this weekend which is like the heart of all the follow-on rain is the follow-on rain normal rain or not it’s going to be excessive the good news is it should be out of the continental united states by the weekend this system later today will be a tropical depression moving to the west of jackson mississippi probably by tomorrow afternoon it’s about 200 miles to the south of nashville by the time we get to wednesday afternoon it’s in central west virginia and then by early friday morning it’s south of new england along that path this week though we’re expecting anywhere from four to eight inches of rain into the tennessee river valley over the next 36 hours and then it’s two to four inches of rain from west virginia to southern new england between wednesday and friday morning
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Hurricane Ida Slams Into New Orleans, Tests Levee System

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