Learn To Fly Here #2 | Engine Starting | Propeller Safety | ACS | Microsoft Flight Simulator

Learn To Fly Here #2 | Engine Starting | Propeller Safety | ACS | Microsoft Flight Simulator

in this video we’re going to talk about engine starting and considerations besides turning a key we’re going to play a game called what’s wrong with this picture we will shout words out a tiny window and we will try very hard not to look at the creepy man sitting inside the airplane into the airplane prior to pre-flight is a good time to take an overall assessment of the aircraft is there anything preventing the airplane from being started safely such as tie-downs chalks urgent covers in the intro we said we’re going to play a game called what’s wrong with this picture we can see the aircraft is tied down and the wheel chocks are in place and the pilot is inside ready to start the engine and we’ll say that pilot removes the tie downs and proceeded to start the airplane and is in this situation so now i’ll ask again what’s wrong with this picture and you can clearly see there is a wheel chalk on the nose and on both mains and this may be microsoft flight simulator but this does happen in the real world and you will see the point that i am trying to make and how does one get in this situation one reason is not doing a proper pre-flight inspection this is not a good situation to be in and you’ll see why shortly and what about this situation facing the fuel pump and getting ready to start not a good situation either but what about here the parking brake is set and the aircraft is no longer tied down and all wheel chocks are removed there’s also nothing in front of the airplane or behind the airplane now we can start the engine after doing a thorough and complete walk around we’re now to the before starting engine checklist the first item on the checklist breaks and we can see by the handle there they are set when that engine starts if we’re not holding the brakes it is possible the airplane will roll forward next is carburetor heat we want this full off if the carburetor heat were on that would allow unfiltered air to enter the engine then for fuel selector desired tank normally we start and take off on the fullest tank we’re going to say that’s the right tank in the last item radio’s off there’s a switch behind the yoke on the right side that switch is off and it’s not a good idea to have radios on during engine starting it’s better to have them off to prevent electrical spikes to the avionics during starting which could also cause damage to the avionics and you also want as much power as possible going to the starter not to the avionics the throttle needs to go one quarter inch open for starting the engine when cold next the master switch to on then the electric fuel pump to on and then the mixture rich and one thing to watch for when we turn the electric fuel pump on and the mixture to rich we want to verify that the fuel pressure increases this airplane has an engine driven fuel pump but obviously when the engine’s off it needs an electric fuel pump to get fuel to the engine so we need to do two things before we turn the key we need to look around the airplane make sure there’s nobody around it and then we need to open the window and yell clear prop and when you do that be loud and be authoritative and then wait a few seconds before starting the airplane if there is somebody down underneath the nose where you can’t see them give them time to move now that we’ve turned the ignition switch to the start position once the engine fires we can let go of it it’s spring-loaded to the both position in the both position that just means both magnetos are working and supplying a spark to all the spark plugs the next thing we need to do is adjust the throttle to 800 to 1000 rpm and then check for oil pressure and here we have this note from the pilot’s operating handbook if oil pressure is not indicated within 30 seconds stop the engine and determine the trouble that’s very important if you don’t have oil pressure within 30 seconds mixture would go to cut off and here’s a sometimes common mistake one that i’ve actually seen back when i was a flight instructor the student will start the engine they’ve got the throttle crack too much the rpm goes way over a thousand they leave it there and they don’t even realize it needs to be pulled back to a thousand they don’t even realize that it’s up there and this is another good reason to set the parking brake because if this happens this will make the airplane roll forward so get the throttle pulled back to the optimum range suggested by the poh and also check for oil pressure now let’s look at a few other situations that can be encountered during engine starting and straight out of the faa’s airplane flying handbook although quite rare the starter motor may remain electrically and mechanically engaged after engine start this can be detected by a continuous and very high current draw on the ammeter some airplanes also have a starter engaged warning light specifically for this purpose the engine should be shut down immediately if this occurs and the bottom paragraph is very important also the pilot should be attentive for sounds vibrations smell or smoke that are not consistent with normal operational experience any concerns should lead to a shutdown and further investigation so one example of this if you have a good engine start but after the engine start you notice the airplane is shaking there’s a vibration there could be something wrong with propeller the engine that would be an indication to shut the airplane down and cancel the flight let’s say we do an engine start and we do get a stuck starter this is what it will look like you can also see over to the right of the mixture is the ammeter and it’s pegged all the way to the right it’s showing a very high load which is telling us that the starter is engaged there should be a checklist procedure for this if not the engine would need to be shut down immediately keep in mind when the mixture is pulled to cut off the electrical power is still going to the starter the starter won’t be de-energized until the master switch is turned off here’s the section out of the airmen certification standards on engine starting and one thing we didn’t cover a lot because i can’t duplicate in microsoft flight simulator but there are different scenarios for engines starting their starting engine when cold when hot when flooded and there’s even a procedure for starting with an external power source and there can even be engine limitations related to starting such as how long can the starter be engaged how many start attempts can you make so for example a start limitation might be 10 seconds with the starter engaged followed by a 20 second rest period and you can do that three times after the third time you may have to wait a certain period of time for the starter to cool down before more engine starts can be attempted for risk management we’re going to look at a case study on propeller safety so here’s the situation we saw a few minutes ago the engine has started but the wheel chocks are still in place in real world flying you would think nobody in their right mind would reach down and pull the chalks out with that propeller spinning would you do it i hope not but sadly it does happen it has happened it keeps happening there have been numerous fatal accidents from people walking into propellers and believe it or not here’s a recent situation where it actually happened this is from an ntsb report the pilot reported that he performed a pre-flight inspection at night and started the airplane but the airplane would not move forward as he attempted to taxi from parking to the runway the pilot looked out the left window to see if there were wheel chocks and his passenger exited the right door and checked the right main landing gear for wheel chocks the passenger then moved to the front of the airplane and attempted to remove the chalks from the nose wheel the passenger’s right hand was struck by the propeller which resulted in a serious injury so right there is an actual report where this actually happened not that long ago and this was totally 100 percent preventable so why am i bringing this up this is why of the 286 people that answered this poll sixteen percent of you fly ten percent of you are learning to fly eleven percent are planning to take lessons in the future and another 38 percent want to learn to fly someday so how could this accident have been prevented and one way to do that is for the pilot to brief the passengers to not exit the airplane until the propeller has stopped turning include that on the passenger briefing before the flight and if you see somebody exiting the airplane pull the mixture to idle and shut the engine off immediately and this is something that i’ve seen happen i’ve seen people give airplane rides they don’t want to shut the engine off they let people exit they let another group get on and they leave the engine on the whole time and the passengers getting on and off for just one misstep away from walking into or falling into a spinning propeller and here’s another situation where a propeller did damage this time it was to an airplane and if you want more information on engine starting the faas airplane flying handbook section 2 has a large section on engine starting and this is a free publication on the faa’s website and one more fantastic publication is this the risk management handbook this book talks all about risk management but also has lots of case studies and lots of discussion on the events that happened so in closing be careful around airplane propellers treat it with a lot of respect treat it like it’s always on and be sure to brief your passengers on propeller safety [Music]
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Learn To Fly Here #2 | Engine Starting | Propeller Safety | ACS | Microsoft Flight Simulator

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