L&L10: ATL Dialogue

L&L10: ATL Dialogue

for this atl skill lesson we’ll be focusing on forms of writing dialogue these are your guided notes and you will be completing them as directed as we go through it remember that an atl skill is a skill that we want to master the focus for this lesson is to use appropriate forms of writing for different purposes and audiences by including dialogue here’s the word dialogue here you’re going to write it here you may recall that you are for this summative writing a narrative and you it works really well to use dialogue in a narrative but not necessarily an argumentative essay why is it important to add dialogue when creating a narrative i want you to highlight which of these reasons for adding dialogue seems the most important the first one it brings the characters to life and makes them seem more real second it moves the narrative forward and third it engages the reader part two we’re going to review the dialogue parts and rules dialogue contains two parts first what the character says and second what’s it’s called a dialogue tag tag which is the sent the speaking verb plus the speaking identification the sentence that the speaker says begins and ends with quotation marks here’s an example do you like these so this is what the character says it’s got quotation marks around it on the outside of the punctuation and this is the tag asked tina so here are some rules about dialogue it says limit using generic speaking verbs like said and told and if you’re struggling with different verbs to use here’s a partial list of different types of verbs you can see the first column is when it’s somewhat neutral this might be when you’re feeling happy or excited sad upset etc so here are different emotions then it will help you have a variety of tag verbs the reason it says partial is there’s definitely more than this you might want to find more and if you want more you can look at a bigger list of tag words to help you another rule for dialogue is to include words that describe body language and tone for example do you like these as tina while she reached for another thin mint cookie this part that’s underlying is describing what she is doing while she says it that strengthens the image that the reader will have in their mind and the last one is punctuate dialogue properly to make it easier for the reader to understand and for the dialogue rules you’re going to select this link and then you can go through the different dialogue rules based on this video again you’ll watch this video to complete the responses under the rules section once you have watched and completed this section you’re going to come to part three where there’s a few practice practices um after completing part two review your notes on how to punctuate dialogue to help use elect the best answer for questions one through three so you’re going to highlight the correct way to punctuate the sentence here is the sentence hi jim said to his friend and you’re going to pick a b or c for which one is punctuated accurately do the same for number two and number three for this last part the directions are use the partial list of speaking verbs tag words so speaking verbs and tag words are the same thing sometimes you say tag verbs but these are all up here speaking verbs or tag words so you’re going to find one of those words that you think you can replace the word said with here’s an example brandon said mother why didn’t you take out the garbage when i asked you to last night what would be a more descriptive speaking verb than said and you might want to change it the word said to scold it so you have these two sentences here where the word said is used read the sentences and decide what would be a better speaking verb than the word said and we and write that here next you’ll complete your reflection and if there’s a lot of time left these are two videos on onto how to really enhance your dialogue writing
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L&L10: ATL Dialogue

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