Meeting the Education Needs of Displaced Children – July 2021 #UK #CANADA #ECW #UNHCR

Meeting the Education Needs of Displaced Children – July 2021 #UK #CANADA #ECW #UNHCR

[Music] despite all the setbacks of covert where nearly a billion children lost a year’s schooling all of us i mean the entire world remain resolute in our determination that ours will be the first generation in history in which every single child every boy and every girl goes to school and that child marriage child labor child trafficking which have been on the rise this year become by the end of this decade a thing of the past as we meet the sustainable development goal for universal school education and so this summit signals the desire of all organizations concerned with the funding we need that sdg4 cannot be achieved without getting into school all children and that means the 35 million children forcibly displaced not least because of new emergencies in myanmar ethiopia and the occupied palestinian territories you know even before covert 19 hit half of all refugee children were out of school 20 million displaced girls particularly adolescents are at risk now of permanently dropping out of school due to conflict and crisis in losing access to school they would not only lose the opportunity to learn but also the protection that schools afford against domestic violence early enforced marriage early pregnancy and without concerted efforts to meet the needs of children displaced by conflict and crisis the 40 million targets set by the g7 to get children into school as girls will not be met ecw is the global education fund for meeting the needs of children impacted by forced displacement as part of the response to refugees everywhere and this approach kickstarts a better way to design emergency approaches for sustainability and equity the world bank has estimated that meeting the needs of refugee children alone will require the international community to spend over 4.8 billion dollars per annum so that they’re in school and learning today we will hear from ministers from pakistan and burkina faso as well as the voices of young refugees themselves this week we will replenish gp for its valuable work soon we must replenish ecw led by yasmin sharif then we must extend facilities like the effort guaranteed facilities so that we have additional finance to do all we need to do in education because we have one reason for acting to ensure that instead of some children developing some of the potential in some of the world’s countries all children can develop all the potential in every country wonderful thank you all for being here with us and thank you to gordon brown for starting us off with that call to action with a reminder why we’re here at the global education summit this week we’re here to think about getting all children into school and learning and this session is about really looking at the needs of displaced children um i’m becky telford i’m unhcl’s chief of education and this session is co-hosted between unhcr and education cannot wait so without further ado i’m going to hand over to yasmine sharif education cannot wait director yes me thank you very much thank you very much becky and i would like also like to thank our co-hosts unhr and i also would like to thank those who have also contributed to making this session possible namely the uk fcdo and canada um thank you all and thank you all for also participating we have i think 1400 participant registered which shows uh how how great is the concern for those left furthest behind as forcibly displaced children and youth in situations of conflict armed conflict climate induced disasters they are the ones left farthest behind now a person becomes displaced every two seconds just think about it every two seconds there’s a new displaced forcibly displaced person that is six peoples forced to flee their homes by the end of this very sentence today some 82.4 million children and youth and their families and communities are currently displaced by armed conflicts persecution and climate induced disasters and of course persecution and conflict entails crimes against humanity and systematic violations of human rights and war crimes so we’re speaking about very abnormal environments more this is this number of 82.4 million is the biggest number unprecedented number since world war ii and almost half of those who are displaced are 42 are youth and children they are school aged children and youth 42 of them we also know that today um as opposed to a hundred years ago um conflicts in humanitarian settings lasts much longer than an education of 12 years for a child look at afghanistan that’s lasted for over 40 years now look at the democratic republic of congo the congo you’re speaking about 60 years most conflicts are not resolved on time for a child to return back to school in the country of a region or the place of a region many of them remain out of school throughout the duration of their forced displacement and here we speak about the generation after the generation when it comes to climate-induced disasters in 2020 alone only the first part the first six months of 2020 9.8 million were forcibly displaced as a result of climate induced disaster and when it comes to internal displaced and refugees and we see refugees right now at the heart of sub-saharan africa who are fleeing from one country to another country from one place in other place of region again and again being approached and dispossessed is part of their daily life they flee constant on conflict or climate induced disaster so they are internally displaced and refugees again and again and again making it absolutely impossible to attend the continuous quality education in a safe learning environment and this lack of safety and security it’s not rocket science we all know this will have severe toxic chronic stress impact that have a long long standing effects on their development their ability to learn and their future to actually rebuild their societies and rebuild their own lives that’s why and we know what are they affected by and they’re affected by the chronic fare of their schools being bombed their family members being killed losing their siblings being subject to trafficking child labor gender-based violence sexual abuse which is a means of warfare exploitation child marriage early pregnancies and of course all of that having those long-term effects now among the refugees in the forcibly displaced refugee girls unfortunately displaced internal displaced girls and children with disabilities are those who are the most marginalized and absolutely the ones furthest furthest left behind and so they are the ones that are the most at risk the refugee girls the adolescent girls and the girls with disabilities through adolescent girls with disabilities who have been forcibly displaced now what is the result of this that they have the lowest the lowest figures of learning outcomes and even school attendance is not just enough to attend school because those figures are staggering 13 48 of all school-aged refugee children and youth are out of school 48 39 do not attend primary school and 77 don’t even make it to secondary school so we have all this long-standing challenge abnormal challenges causing forcibly displacement for a long time and then on top of it we have kobit 19 coming and of course creating an unprecedented figure of 90 of children and youth worldwide not being able to go to school and when we speak about context where you have refugees and internal displays we started off education cannot wait with an estimated number of 75 million children in use in 2016 and today that number in emergencies and privilege crisis has grown to 128 million so instead of going forward we are going significantly backward so if we want to win this human race we have to move faster and bigger and bolder now now one way of doing that and that’s where we as education cannot wait where we are have our own very specific role as the the the fund specifically designated for emergencies in crisis and thereby complement the global partnership for education that has many more countries that may not necessarily be in conflict under their portfolio what we have learned from education cannot wait which has enabled us to move with the speed without compromising quality is and it’s it’s a plea to everyone working in conflict and crisis or contributing to it financially we have to work together the era of silos competition it is over it has to be over we can only do this if we do this together and the ecw model is precisely about that it’s about giving the civil society organizations both international organizations and local civil society organizations the same place the same role and value as our great partners in the u.n community the u.n agencies especially unhr unicef unesco wfp and many others but also to remember we have a huge civil society a movement that often reached those most inaccessible and to bear that in mind and also the close cooperation with the host governments the minister of education and other parts of the government the host communities that are all rather living on the margins of the society themselves who also need support and most of all the refugees the forcibly displaced children and youth themselves in ecw they sit around the table with us it’s about their right to education and their learning so they are the decision makers as well so working together it also means to bring the humanitarian actors and funding sources and the development actors and development funding sources together take a country that is in the middle of a conflict like afghanistan drc central african republic you need to be able to move fast in certain areas when the high commission of refugees felipe grande and i traveled to the democratic republic of congo a couple of months ago we were at the border of central african republic seven hours away from a congo from kinshasa we saw literally saw the refugees from central african republic crossing the border into congo into safety together with the government we were there because we had an emergency window that’s the humanitarian side we were able on spot to announce two million dollars from education cannot wait for the organizations civil society un unhr afsc and others to work together continue the great they were doing to accommodate the new arrivals but we also need to look at education from a development perspective if we want 12 years of education we need sustainability and we need long-term investments and that’s where education and outweight also has a window called the multi-resilience window which allows us to plan three or four years ahead working with recognized coordination structures established by the only real multilateral organization we have in the world today when it comes to conflict and disasters which is the united nations where we have members like the world bank the eu the african union and other regional organizations with the same same right and the same decision-making powers but the importance of using deer coordination mechanisms of wrestling coordinator humanitarian coordinators and that is very much the secret behind the rapid growth of ecw it was at lee supported structures that took three decades to develop to reach those left furthest behind um and i will give an example of a success story and that is in uganda when we came to uganda three years ago unhr was coordinating it because it was a refugee situation in non-refugee situation it’s the cluster coordinating it led by unicef and say the children but in this particular situation again that was unhr and together with unhr they convened all uh civil society organizations refugees the minister of education um all the strategic donor partners on the ground canada uk played a big role the european union played the big role and many european um and and north america and the us usadi and others played their own and we brought everyone together and had joint assessments uh joined the sign to cater to half of the population that fled across the border from south sudan 1.3 million refugees over 50 were school age refugee children and youth and created the first ever refugee education response plan that today according to the government of uganda and according to the learning outcomes that we actually see that have drastically increased what’s the very first and very successful program showing it is possible provided that we work together so that’s another example we have done the same in venezuela where we have um an ngos with society consortium leading our response for the big refugee a case law from venezuela in colombia say the children coordinating with norwegian refugee council and many other swedish society organizations and where unicef leads on ecuador we’ve seen it in bangladesh we seen it in drc central sahel where we have done several multi-year investments just over the past year or two because despite the money that has gone into central sahel the site of central sahel and i traveled there during covert 910 it’s absolutely heartbreaking then nothing has changed for these children so finally for us to be on track for us to be on track and to recover all that we have lost over the past year because of quote 19 and new conflicts as we see in sub-saharan africa and never-ending conflicts in other parts of the world we have to stick to our promises it’s not enough to make a promise and and make a pledge and look good and then not deliver it’s not okay not to deliver on our promises and it’s not it’s not okay to rest until we have fulfilled our duties because we have a duty towards humanity and the promises we made we promised to reach the target of sustainable development goal for and with that we would reach all other sustainable development goals because without 12 years of education we can not attain other sustainable development goals reducing poverty extreme poverty gender equality and partnerships and so forth it’s simply logically not possible if you have a population has not gone to school so start with the foundation of building the house education then the rest will follow logically you have to stand by those commitments you have to stand by the promise we made at the verdum and attend summit when we created education cannot wait where all of us came together under the leadership of gordon brown the u.n special element for global education and many many um governments around the global civil society and u.n agencies took the lead we had to stand by the g7 charlevoix declaration that was led by canada we made a recommitment to girls education we have to stand by the g7 um foreign and development ministerial meeting this year convened by the united kingdom and we had to stand by the global refugee forum pledges made last year in geneva at the global refugee forum in conclusion for education cannot wait for us to reach 9 million plus children and youth of whom 50 are forcibly displaced the large majority refugees we need 400 more million dollars just 400 million more million dollars for 21 to 2023 if we can reach 400 million then we can reach over 9 million children with a holistic quality education for those left for this behind let me conclude by reading a very paraphrasing a short few words from the great poet robert frost the woods are lovely dark and deep but we have promises to keep and miles to go before we sleep thank you wonderful thank you jasmine for setting the scene so overly there as you noted as the nature of conflict and crisis changes displacement becomes more protracted and it’s crucial to think about how to support the children and communities who are displaced as well as those who host them um and to think about how humanitarian and development actors and funders can work together one of the things that you mentioned was the lessons that we’ve learned collectively between our agencies and amongst the organizations and partners on this call and so i’m pleased now to turn to jennifer sklar the senior education director at irc and larry aber of new york university um to present some findings from a recent tutoring programme i think we’re really excited to hear about the work that you’ve been doing and also think a bit more about how we can take those learnings to contribute to meaningful outcomes for children in crisis context um i won’t introduce you further but to note for everyone that we’re going to put the biographies of all the panelists in the chat so you can find out more about the speakers jennifer and larry over to you thank you first i want to thank unhcr and ecw for hosting this event and inviting nyu ties and irc to speak on this important topic irc and nyu ties are here today to talk about an initiative known as 3ea which stands for education and emergencies evidence for action so big picture 3ea is about impact measurement and metrics and research practice partnerships is about understanding what works improving measurement and making sure that research practice partnerships enable iterative learning processes but very specifically in nigeria lebanon and sierra leone where we were implementing programs 3a looked different across contexts but at its foundation was a combination of social emotional learning and academic skill development and how do we think about social emotional learning irc’s healing classrooms started because we heard from teachers that students need something more than reading and math in conflict and crisis context teachers were seeing behaviors and levels of emotional distress that they were not trained to address irc thus engaged in four years of action research in which students and teachers define well-being and daily classroom routines and practices that improve it it turns out teachers not surprisingly were right we now know from research and neuroscience that children in crisis who have prolonged exposure to severe adversities including displacement violence and extreme poverty can lead to a toxic stress response which disrupts healthy brain development and has short and long-term impacts on children’s mental health ability to learn behaviors and relationships social emotional learning is particularly important to mitigate the effects of toxic stress sel skills include an ability to focus remember information control impulses and emotions get along with others solve problems and persevere learning in a healing classroom has been foundational to irc education programs for more than 15 years in 3a this model has been applied to a tutoring program in nigeria and lebanon aimed at improving the literacy numeracy and language skills a refugee displaced and conflict-affected children enrolled in public schools it trains teachers in daily instructional and classroom management practices to create safe predictable and nurturing learning environments it creates teaching and learning materials to build academic and social emotional skills and it connects parents and caregivers to their children’s school in 3a we tested three main types of targeted social emotional learning interventions these were part of the tutoring program so first mindfulness activities which are focused on stress management and emotion regulation through activities such as deep belly breathing and mindful movement second brain games which is a series of game-based activities that help children develop their executive function skills including focused attention short-term working memory and self-control and third we tested in the second year of the project in lebanon a comprehensive curriculum that covered the five key components of social emotional learning skills so in addition to mindfulness and brain games we also included positive social skills conflict resolution and perseverance the activities range from just a few minutes up to 10 minutes and in 3a were implemented two to three times during a tutoring session thank you jennifer um jennifer has shared the remarkable work of the international rescue committee in developing learning and healing classrooms and beginning to learn from it we’re grateful at new york university to be research partners with irc and our job as part of 3ea was to help address through rigorous research the larger question can remedial tutoring programs and the kinds of sel activities that jennifer mentioned impact children’s academic outcomes and social emotional skills and crisis and con in crisis context we don’t want to guess whether we’re having a positive effect on kids we want to know whether we are so that we can make mid-course corrections if we’re not and do more and better if we are next slide today i’m just going to give you a very brief top-level uh um summary of work that we’ve been doing for four or five years uh and uh the first uh set of results has to do with the impact of healing classrooms tutoring per se and what we found is that in lebanon a half year of healing classrooms tutoring improved kids perceptions of their school and remedial environments and their behavior regulation it affected the kinds of school conditions that uh yasmine was emphasizing earlier uh that were so important of safety security uh support in niger a full year of healing classrooms improved literacy and numeracy skills and these were very significant advances next slide please what happens when we combine that kind of healing classrooms tutoring with social emotional learning activities like brain games and mindfulness what we found was that there were academic outcomes to adding mindfulness and brain games in niger it it improved kids grades besides their scores on literacy and numeracy tests and grades include the ability to pay attention and manage yourself and things like that so we we consider grades a social emotional learning outcome we also found that the addition of mindfulness in brain games uh mindfulness in lebanon and nigeria improved literacy and numeracy skills on the social-emotional side adding mindfulness improves sadness regulation uh aggression and the five component sel uh really shows very promising signals of improving social emotional uh knowledge and skills but not quite to the level of being able to say we’ve definitively shown that the bottom line here are two the first is that adding social emotional learning skills shows to provide a boost to healing classrooms in improving academic outcomes so what have we concluded what we’ve concluded uh next slide is that the glass is half full and half empty it’s half full because we’ve got so many of these promising results using very rigorous experimental research standards that are culturally attuned but it’s half empty because we’re not always getting the social emotional outcomes and the learning outcomes we want number one and number two the learning outcomes aren’t progressing fast enough to be confident that kids are going to end school literate and numeric we have many hypotheses about how to improve impact we have clear evidence that improving attendance and improving the amount of programs children receive when attending uh increases uh outcomes improves outcomes we have clear qualitative research indicating that if teachers feel comfortable and more skilled in social emotional learning kids do better and finally there’s a major issue around how to contextualize this work to really fit with uh cultural and national values and and and priorities next and slide so uh we haven’t waited to do those studies though to begin to act in lebanon nyu is working hard with the lebanese government to map uh what the government what programs are uh occurring currently in the country that what their focus is because that social emotional learning is a huge area we’ve also been interviewing parents teachers and children to bring their understanding of what they value most into programming and finally we’re working at scale to measure social emotional skills so that it is possible to monitor and guide policy related to that back to you jennifer so next slide so as larry mentioned when talking about our hypothesis we did find that teachers had difficulty with some of the concepts of social emotional learning so in nigeria with funding from usa div we contextualized social emotional learning by researching the the values beliefs priorities of teachers and students while we designed the project we use behavioral insights and human-centered design to engage teachers in the co-creation of social-emotional learning activities that teachers themselves could then iteratively test in the classroom for example teachers had identified discipline respect and tolerance of others as key social emotional learning activities and they were able to source a lot of games songs and stories that they were already using to promote these specific values the end result was social emotional learning activities that were more contextualized and relevant to teachers and students so just just to summarize i mean we recommend of course continued investment in holistic child outcomes particularly in social emotional learning as well as remediation programs for refugee displaced conflict affected children enrolled in public schools these are particularly important now in the time of coven 19 when education’s role in children’s mental health and well-being is widely felt and understood and when remediation is also recognized as crucial for children experiencing prolonged school closures something with which children in crisis are too familiar we’ve also shown in this presentation the importance of investing in longer term research and research practice partnerships so enabling design research to be able to test and iterate and get the design right implementation research that looks at the factors that hinder or enable the implement implementation of interventions such as social emotional learning activities in the classroom and finally mixed methods impact research which looks at what works how for whom where and at what cost and under what condition i’d say scale research is really important so really bringing in cost analysis looking at cost efficiency and cost effectiveness and really to determine how to reach the most kids with meaningful changes at the lowest cost um so again thank you so much and uh yeah thank you thank you fantastic thank you jennifer and larry i think sharing lessons from from programs such as this is one way where we can collectively focus on on the things that we know what and make sure that um bringing in holistic needs and responses for displaced populations do so in a way that enable children to learn um larry you mentioned the need to bring in the the needs and also really listen to children and parents and teachers in order to create solutions that make a difference to better understand the current situation from the perspective of refugees themselves and the incredible contribution that people are making to their own futures i’m delighted to ask jean-marie ishmael to help focus the session on that question jean-marie can you tell us a bit about your your own story and how young people like you are playing such an important role in supporting other refugees to access education thank you thank you becky for your kind introduction ladies and gentlemen it’s a pleasure to be here today among you all the future of refugees and unexplored possibilities comes with improved national systems policies and inclusion there’s been so much conversation and inclusion nationally regionally and globally which has given rise to important aspects around inclusive education we just come to tap into the needs of special groups such as displaced people and refugees being a refugee shouldn’t be a condition that human human being should be compelled to pity and or vulnerability but of coming the shortcomings of the negative effects of being refugees should be addressed in togetherness i am a refugee from the republic of london a small and beautiful country in east africa but with the rich history of what happens when this agreement has become severe i unfortunately find myself one of parents while living in kenya it has not been the easiest going for days without food lacking school fees and despite being great grades i couldn’t secure an admission to university due to issues around documentation and costing my story of resilience and feeling welcome in kenya is a story i share with so many others the free education for primary school in kenya allows so many refugees especially those living in the urban areas to enjoy their right to basic education which helps them develop critical thinking and improve their talents and abilities however this is different with high school and higher education where refugees are now expected to pay for their own tuition which often they are neighbor too due to cost and stable livelihood and limited scholarship opportunities for higher education but thanks to their amazing canadian teachers who effortlessly support refugees without minding their identity and status and this is the true meaning of inclusive education it is through education that we realize our full potential and can critically contribute to our personal growth and kenya’s economy the challenges that refugees face in the national context revolve around policy and systems here in kenya many refugees face countless issues on documentation like obtaining work permits care repaints costs and status this not only delays their hope for a future but also enormously hinders them to secure job opportunities that would have been a life changer to their situation for refugees to be self-reliant reliant start businesses or look for employment the processes of acquiring work documents should be simplified right to work is a basic human right and refugees should be given the right to work in their host countries to be able to fully integrate in national systems and be part of the society we should all have the same ground to serve the community while so many organizations are starting to believe that it’s important to make refugees self-reliant we must and wish would come to the fact that for refugees to be self-reliant the barriers and challenges they face have to be reduced by including them in national systems hence it’s important that the same national system that allow refugees to study allow them to make use of their skills and knowledge as a believer in possibilities i want to echo the words of a great kenyan marathoner eliot kipchoge who said no human is limited national systems and policies should not limit any refugee from exercising their potential in contributing to the bettering of the world i congratulate the commitment that kenya has made to create a more inclusive national system and policy when you’re given a chance to study when you’re included in classrooms you can’t contribute back that’s how as a third year journalism and media study student at the university of nairobi under the duffy scholarship i have founded a media and mentorship social enterprise called naweza now as a wishes to nurture and support refugee youth and other marginalized kenyan communities by instilling belief and skills sharing stories of talented refugee youth positive contributions to kenya with the aim of changing the difficult today to a fruitful tomorrow i wish to quote the powerful words of nelson mandela it always seems impossible until it’s done ladies and gentlemen it might feel impossible but we should believe we can change the refugees and support refugees education talent work ideas businesses and abilities when we include them and we should let’s do it good people thank you i believe i can refugees can do it thank you rebecca and thank you uh jean-marie for those inspiring words i think you’ve you’ve said uh the things which are in the hearts of so many people on this call um i think it’s also a you know timely reminder of the assets and energy that refugees themselves bring to these conversations and you also talked about the the crucial contribution that host governments like kenya play in facilitating high quality inclusive education and access for all um with the engagement of governments in mind i’m really delighted to hand over uh to the honourable karina gould the minister of international development in canada and also the honourable stennister uaru the minister of national education and literacy of bikini faso who together are going to share some reflections on how national systems have been able to respond to the needs of displaced populations globally minister gould perhaps i can turn to you first and tell us a bit more about canada’s global call to action in this area as well absolutely well thank you so much becky and thank you to education cannot wait and everyone who’s put today’s meeting together and i would just like to give a special shout out to jean-marie i think you did a fantastic job setting the stage for us but also showing us what is possible and what we should be striving for so thank you very much for that um i’m joining you from uh burlington ontario canada which is the traditional territory of the anishinaabe in the hot neshoni and most recently the mississaugas of the credit people and for us in canada we are very committed to the global compact for refugees for education and to the sustainable development goals and leaving no one behind and part of this commitment is ensuring that every child everywhere has access to education and when we talk about every child everywhere that includes refugee and displaced children and when i think about this and i’ve had many conversations with yasmine about this over the past couple of years about why this matters i think jean-marie exemplifies it right we’re talking about children who have hopes who have aspirations who have potential and who have so much to offer the world to offer their communities to offer their countries and to offer this global community that we live in and so what can we all be doing as donors as host countries as individuals who are passionate about this whether working in civil society or ngos to ensure that every single child has access to that education and that quality education and that’s why jennifer and lawrence’s presentation was so important because it talked about the unique needs of displaced children and the fact that um it’s not just about providing reading and math it’s about making sure that there is a holistic safe environment for refugee and displaced children and ensuring that teachers have the resources and the supports that they need and certainly one of the things that i’ve heard over the past year and a half through covid is from some incredible amazing educators um i remember one conversation i had with an educator from dadaab refugee camp who was talking about you know going house to house with materials to ensure that the students that he was teaching had access he was talking about conversations over whatsapp and how he was you know having um you know how he was uh trying to evaluate you know submissions over whatsapp but really you know so unbelievably committed to the education and the future of his students and in that vein um earlier this year i had the privilege of launching canada’s together for learning campaign which really looks to galvanize the world to make sure that we reach every single refugee and displaced children to provide that education and working with partners like education cannot wait working with partners like the gpe working with partners like the minister from burkina faso who canada has supported both through the charlevoix initiative but also through their applications to the gpe it’s making sure that our partner countries have the resources and the support to provide that education because we know that they want to do that and that they want to ensure that every child that finds themselves within their borders has access to that education and one of the elements of the together for learning campaign was the creation of the refugee education council which brings together people with lived experience both refugee learners as well as those who are at educators and those who are working in the field to help guide canada as we you know create and deliver this campaign but also um you know as we think about what programming and and what we need to be doing together as a world and um you know speaking with them is always the most inspiring thing that one can do because they have you know overcome such adversity but also demonstrated the potential that each one of them has but one of the things that they have said that resonates with me and i think you know puts us and grounds us in why we’re doing this is that education is more than just school it’s more than just um learning which is obviously very important but for any child but particularly for a child that has been displaced it’s often a place of safety and it’s a place of hope and that’s the message that they have provided to me time and time again that this is about ensuring that every single child around the world has access to education and has access to opportunities moving into their future and the one other message that they provide me is make sure that you enable us to get to school that we get a good quality education but that you can also connect us to opportunities once we’ve finished learning as well because we want to contribute we want to be you know active engaged members of our community of our society of our country of our world and so that’s on all of us to make sure that we are providing that quality education but also connecting them to opportunities as well because when i reflect on you know when we talk about displaced children or refugees you know we’re just talking about people who found themselves in circumstances that were beyond their control that found themselves um you know fleeing for safety and finding safety should not uh limit their potential and their opportunity and so i think today’s conversation is one that is so important and it’s one that canada is committed to keeping ongoing um and continuing so that we can reach those objectives and we can reach every single child uh right around the world no matter what their status is so becky back over to you i think thanks uh minister uro over to you yes mean public foreign development [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] foreign [Music] foreign [Music] [Music] is [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] [Music] a [Music] [Music] wonderful thank you so much um to both the ministers i think you’ve really set out you know a range of the challenges with different displaced populations with security needs and other needs of host community children and i just want to really thank you know both canada and burkina faso for the incredible commitment that you continue to show to refugees and other marginalized populations and the voice that you you bring to the global stage to encourage others to do the same um i think what’s been really clear from this conversation so far is the need for a really concerted international effort um for different groups and different stakeholders to to come together um we’re going to hear next from the uk and pakistan to hear a little bit more about what governments and those stakeholders can do um so i’m delighted to invite first the honourable wendy morton the uk minister for european neighbourhood and the americas um to tell us a bit more about the uk’s global leadership in this space and in particular setting some really ambitious g7 targets and how this can help drive forward transformation thanks great thank you uh rebecca and uh good afternoon everybody and the pandemic has given most parents a taste of the anguish that comes from fearing that your children are missing out on the education they need and deserve and so thank you to education cannot wait and unhcr for organizing this important conversation today and for inviting me to reflect on what donors can do to help ensure that displaced children can continue their education and hold on to the chance of a better future with 33 million under 18s displaced last year by conflict and crisis the first point i want to make is that this has to be a global effort we need strong partnerships between countries in crisis host communities donors and education providers and so in advance of the global education summit the uk secured g7 endorsement of our ambitious global targets of getting 40 million more girls in school and 20 million more reading by the end of primary school over the next five years in low and lower middle income countries we have a particular focus on girls because they are more at risk of dropping out of school than boys and as many as 20 million girls could do so next year earlier this year our prime minister published our new girls education action plan we have made our largest ever pledge of 430 million pounds to the global partnership for education to help deliver on these targets in some of the poorest countries in the world the uk is also the largest domain to education cannot wait with funding of 90 million pounds until 2023 this has helped support and educate around 3.9 million children since 2016. including refugees from the democratic republic of congo and myanmar who have sought refuge in uganda and bangladesh education cannot wait is calling for an additional 219 million pounds next year to help those affected by conflict and crisis and we encourage donors to step up in addition to these contributions we are using uk aid to fund schools teachers and books around the world and to build the evidence space to help ensure displaced populations can access quality learning we have education advisors in 18 countries where poverty and conflict prevent children from going to school these advisors help to coordinate our support and they work with governments and partners to influence policies and to deliver education programmes in pakistan for example our flagship education program has helped over 7 million girls in primary and secondary schools school enrollment and attendance have increased learning outcomes have improved and teacher attendance is up equivalent to more than 20 000 teachers working each day in punjab alone in somalia we have worked with care international to support more than 27 000 girls in 199 rural and remote schools many of which are in disputed border zones we’ve also funded the unhcr to help teachers respond to the kobit 19 crisis in refugee communities in pakistan for example this meant that teachers in unhcr supported schools continue to receive stipends throughout the pandemic regardless of whether the schools were closed by government’s restrictions and this enabled them to support students throughout through the disruption and to be there to reopen schools and to provide a safe learning environment as i touched on earlier there is a chronic lack of in-depth research into the best methods of providing education in areas affected by conflicts and long-term crises and so earlier this month the foreign secretary announced a new 15 million pound research project that will assess the most effective ways of giving the world’s most vulnerable children an education and the research will focus on northern nigeria south sudan myanmar syria jordan and lebanon communities that currently host an estimated three million displaced children and we’re also working closely with partners such as canada to accelerate progress for refugees and displaced children and we will develop joint partnerships in countries where we both have education advisors and we’re helping them to amplify their together for learning campaign which promotes quality education and lifelong learning opportunities for displaced and host communities through our funding our partnerships and our ambitious targets the uk is committed to the education of children affected by conflict and priorities there is no greater what prize for humanity than our children realizing their potential and so we really look forward to continuing this work with you and i’d like to now hand over to minister mahmoud thank you well let me begin by thanking uh education cannot wait and unhcr and fcdo for this conference and for inviting me into it minister wendy martin spoke about the different areas in which the british government has been helping pakistan and that is we are we are grateful for that uh defend uh and british council have had a long association with education in pakistan and this association continues uh just this morning i had a separate meeting with the british council in which we uh went over our program and looked towards the further uh collaboration and working together but on this special subject of displaced children pakistan has had unprecedented crises of refugees when the war broke out in afghanistan uh nearly three million refugees when after the soviet invasion uh came to madison and despite uh almost uh 31 years having sorry 41 years having passed by we still have about 1.5 million afghan refugees in pakistan then because of the the terrorism in pakistan and the action taken by the government of government to combat it we had about a million internally displaced people so uh the afghan refugees continued but then we had internally uh displaced people from swarth and from the federation from the friendly federally administered enriched uh travel areas so over the last 40 45 years pakistan has been dealing with the education needs of displaced children then we were lately started to experience the effects of climate change and the climate change effect is on on different levels there are there is widespread flooding in some areas there is drought in some areas actually agriculture is being affected because of unseasonable uh rains or at times drought which was unexpected drought water scarcity is being felt in the agriculture and some of the dams which usually fill up during this time of the year are not filling up so it all of this affects uh displaces people uh downstream and that again adds to the number of children that we have to look after who are being displaced just to give an example uh for when uh when troubles broke out in swath and fata 700 schools were damaged so we have we are now constructing 350 schools and uh incidentally the british government is helping with basic life and literacy skills to girls also but this is a huge challenge but there are so many people so one of the ways in which we address this challenge was uh obviously to build schools as much as many schools as possible in the in the refugee camps but not only that we opened our own schools to all the children who were refugees so uh there was no difference as far as access is concerned to pakistani children and those children of our children who were displaced and came to manchester obviously for internally displaced people again there was no absolutely no discrimination other than establishing special schools uh in the camps obviously all other schools were available too um because of this this kind of access to pakistani schools the whole generation of iran has actually studied in pakistan and many of them who are now important positions have been through the uh have been through the pakistani school system so this is a challenge which is uh which continues to grow and this is a challenge which and it continues to grow because we are expecting that sadly there is a possibility of further civil war in afghanistan because of this possibility of further civil war in afghanistan i feel we’ve lost the minister um [Music] so as we’re slightly over time i’m going to suggest that we carry on um thank you to the minister from the uk and from pakistan really for the commitment that you show and also for that call to action it’s so crucial that we keep remembering how we can work together to support populations um thinking about working together it’s not just with governments and not just with with refugees and communities themselves but also with civil society who can really share some lessons and sometimes be the support to our conscious in terms of what we need to do so i’d like to actually invite david miliband to the president and ceo of irc just to share some remarks and some reflections about how we can move forward together thanks very much indeed it’s a real honor to be able to speak to this group i think so far this has been a really fantastic and inspiring conversation and i’ve been asked to draw some threads together and that’s what i’m going to try and do in a brief period of time available to me obviously huge thanks to unhcr and to education cannot wait for convening this group i come to this really standing on the shoulders of irc’s teams around the world as some of you will know we work exclusively in crisis and crisis affected contexts and we know that for children in these settings education is a lifeline not a luxury um in the academic year of 19 of 2019 2020 we reached over 800 000 children and trained 20 000 teachers and i’ll draw on that experience in some remarks today i want to start by highlighting a certain irony of this gathering on the one hand what this gathering shows is that more people are coming together than ever before to say that the absence of effective education for children affected by crisis is a massive hole in global plans for resilience and for progress even before covid the world was failing to deliver on the promises of sustainable development goal 4 and failing to deliver on the commitments of the global compact for refugees we also know that there’s more evidence about what works than ever before that’s the good news on the other hand despite this coalition that’s coming together the gap between needs and provision is growing not shrinking and i think we need to address that head-on and we need a call for action about what comes next that is urgent but also bold more resources are needed but we also need better resources better aimed at those missing out better aligned with mainstream schooling better harnessing private resources as well as public resources better integrating social and emotional learning into mainstream curriculum and what i would like to do is just highlight five ways in which we can take forward the conversation today in a way that i think is proactive and purposeful a priority one and the minister from burkino faso spoke to this is to ensure that displaced populations are included in formal education we know in our work in niger are very powerful examples of that as well despite the funding challenges nigeria is including and integrating refugees and displaced people into public schools for example in difa where we work with them this approach is cost effective and it’s also cost efficient a priority two is direct funding and i want to emphasize this on a multi-year basis to fund outcomes not just outputs this is the way to deliver flexibility at the front line a good example would be irc’s play matters project in ethiopia uganda and tanzania where 100 million dollar investment by the lego foundation over five years is allowing us with critical community partners to transform education for displaced and host community children that emphasis on multi-year funding is designed around the needs of children not the bureaucratic imperatives of governments and i think that’s incredibly important we’re able because of multi-year support to design test and iterate new approaches to learning that are both delivering academic and social and emotional skills and from our point of view this focus on outcomes is something that donors should require that grantees define and monitor as they make progress priority three is to treat formal and informal education as complementary not competing quality funding that achieves quality impact needs to be flexible and allocated to non-formal solutions as well as formal schools to help children catch up and to provide the entry points into formal schooling where it exists but where it doesn’t exist trusted ngo partners can provide critical support to provide to deliver complementary programs like the remedial tutoring program that my colleague jennifer sklar and our partner larry alba spoke about earlier today displaced children will always need support outside traditional settings and we can’t afford to see it as second best in too many places it’s all that exists priority four is to recognize that social and emotional learning is critical for children who are struggling with trauma due to conflict and displacement social and emotional learning can mitigate the impact that crisis has on children’s developing brains and set them on a course for a better future when schooling is available and beyond that and i think it’s really important as the world struggles to come to terms with the impact of covid on all people that we recognize that the social and emotional aspect of learning for displaced children is especially important priority five and i don’t think this has been mentioned very much so far is to take a disciplined approach to the use of technology we know all too well that throwing technology in unsuitable ways doesn’t work but we also know from what we’ve learned in the world’s largest refugee camp in cox’s bazar in bangladesh how technology can make a big difference in facilitating mass learning we’ve been using teachers and tablets to help rohingya refugee children continue to learn obviously in other places there are bandwidth issues but we have evidence of what works in low bandwidth zones as well as those that have better connectivity for example i’m really excited about our play well program delivering social and emotional learning to audio content i emphasize that audio content to children in colombia on a radio station with a listening base of three and a half million children the challenge in education is to get the personal touch and to get scale and i think that we’ve got to think about the appropriate use of different technologies to help make that possible finally this is the uh payoff if we don’t have actionable rigorous research we’re not going to be able to convince the donors and so i am a great believer in quality as well as a quantity of research that speaks directly to the impact that our programs have let me conclude by saying that although i started with an irony of the situation of a greater coalition than before but also a greater gap between needs and provision i want to end with a challenge it’s very encouraging to me that the global partnership for education that education cannot wait are highlighting and prioritizing the need to make good on provision for out of school displaced children these are the forgotten children in too many places of the 258 million children out of school before covid struck nearly half 127 million were in fragile and conflict states half of the total these are the places where poverty is growing the fastest where support systems are the weakest and where educational provision is most frail that means we need to think and work in new ways with this coalition and that’s the challenge that we have going forward not just to buttress what already exists but to reinvent appropriate educational provision according to the priorities and principles that i’ve tried to set out on the basis of the learning that we’ve done thank you so much for giving me the chance to speak today and i very much look forward to following up with my team wonderful thank you david i mean i think we’ve all heard that it’s an urgent call to action a call for resources call for research to know what what’s going right and recognizing the need to do that for those left furthest behind um i want to hand over now to uh to people who can help us think about what the daily lived reality of that really looks like um so i’m delighted to introduce megan kellner who’s the associate director for education and adolescent empowerment at brac international who will be in conversation with mrs r who is a community based teacher in herat afghanistan as you can imagine because of the hugely challenging security situation we’ve had to protect the teachers identity so megan let me pass over to you thank you becky brack international is honored today to join this esteemed panel conflict and crisis compound the crippling effects of poverty on the world’s most vulnerable children brac believes systemic change is multifaceted if girls in the displaced have access to quality safe inclusive and culturally relevant learning spaces that are close to home and developed with the critical input of community members leaders and national governments increased enrollment and positive learning outcomes will sustain brac operates in 11 countries in africa and asia where 50 percent of the world’s out of school children reside in nationals first country of operation outside of bangladesh in 2002 with the support and partnership of fcdo and global affairs canada bi operates community co-designed and operated learning programming in 10 provinces a predominant focus is engagement with government hub schools for the effective transition of young displaced girls who are particularly vulnerable amid conflict when brac opened its first one-room schoolhouse in 1985 we believed every quality education starts with a quality teacher who can foster human connection confidence and compassion as the crux of each classroom it is my honor today to introduce to you a champion for afghan children who believes in lifting those most at risk of being left behind as she climbs ms r is a dedicated young afghan teacher in brax community-based schools in herat as her camera will be off i would like to ask all of the esteemed members of this audience to take a moment close your eyes for at least part of the time to listen to miss ara’s voice as she reaches out to us in all our varied countries of attendance from a space where safety is not guaranteed mazar it’s my pleasure to introduce you can you tell us a little bit about yourself and why education is so important to you good afternoon for all uh i hope you are all being great and thank you so much for inviting me in this uh important blue wall uh in this global event into so much i’m one of the teachers and i’m one of the teachers in syria based girls school and i’m graduate i graduated from ministry department it is for years that i’m working with in afghanistan first subject that is belongs to me that uh i’m teaching for students in prague afghanistan hear about chemistry english geography and computers that i’m teaching in secondary school that my students are in illinois and also i’m the daughter of parents who had to migrate for more social security security problem in other countries and why education is so important for me uh in on my best opinion that education is so important in my life because by getting education by communicating continuing education i can make a better life for myself a better future for myself and also a bigger community a better uh ultimate community in my country and also all of us know that education is the basis of a society or community so by telling education but by changing education uh i can or you can respect you from the illiterate and also if you want to have a better community a better society it should be necessary for us to work in our own education to focus on education so as for this reason for this reason that i mentioned to you education is so important in my life thank you thank you miss r and we all commend you for making education such an important part of your life despite many obstacles i’d like to ask you to speak to us a little bit about whether it’s difficult for girls and vulnerable displaced children in your community to get to school can you tell us about some of the challenges that make community-based schools so very important okay thank you uh the many key challenges that students or the children especially girls that they are facing uh when they are running their education process uh one of the important key challenges isn’t that sorry it is the security of the bay and like explosion and also farms and cars is important also the important key or challenge that a student especially girls respecting with that and also there are so worried about this challenge the next point that it is the accident of car motorways and parks that if it happened they’re coming in their schools in their classroom uh they’re worrying also maybe they’re facing a deep challenge the last point or the last key challenge that the students are facing with that it is the street harassment mr parish made by some crazy boys uh because his children are from one side they’re girls and another side they’re uh adults that’s right these the key challenge that um they’re the students or especially girls they’re facing with that when they’re running or when they’re continuing their education thank you mr it sounds like there are many challenges facing children in your community when a student is displaced by conflict what elements do you believe about your school or a school system are important to allow all children to keep okay thank you so much for the decisive side question at the first point that the students especially girls that they they feel safe in our classroom it is their location of their classes at this their class their classroom or their schools is located among the people home it means that they are safe and they are running their education to help stress without any problem it’s just only only if adapted location of their classes another point positive relationship with students and also making a friendly environment in the classroom by this point they feel so realized they feel comfortable and they are coming and they’re also continuing their education in their classroom another point it is the supporting of their families and maybe in my community in my society when they see the supporting of your family that how their family how their parents are encouraging them and also supporting them and also to go and get education to continue education and then i see these enthusiasts in these people uh it makes me so happy and also these students transfer this to me that i am the one who can make a big change in your life and also the teachers and ecosystems that respect the children the children right it is the key point that i mean for you is that the students especially girls in our classroom they feel safe and sound in our classroom thank you thank you miss r i think that you’ve identified some critical things such as relationships with teachers who are supported um to address the psychosocial needs of displaced and close community schools one final quick thought i know that we need to wrap up but as a woman and dog utter of displaced parents who have overcome yourself immense obstacles to pursuantification what is your dream in just a couple sentences for your own future and for the future of afghanistan and mizar thank you from all of us for having the courage to participate today thank you so much for giving this chance uh for today that i was a part of is important even in global events thank you so much and about is the answer of this question what is my wish about my own also about the future of my country about my uh and future that i have a lot of plan that i said for agreeing ahead for centuries you kind of plan and right now i’m back with chemistry so if i get the chance if i get opportunity i again i am going to continue my education and i want to be in the highest level of education and also i’m gonna get my master’s degree for phd is my own wishes for my own future about the future of my in my country so uh i think that as soon as possible together such a real peace in our country and our country afghanistan be independent from every side from uh social side from economic side and from each side that all of the people be independent and no one shouldn’t be obligated to move or to migrate another country and also all of the people in my country be safe and found and they be happy and they continue you’re a lady they have been stressed without any uh war and also they have any problem thank you wonderful thank you both thank you megan and thank you mozart for that timely reminder about their daily lived reality what this really means and thank you for for having so much courage to come and join the conversation we really appreciate it we are almost at the end of the session um thank you people who’ve managed to to stay with us staying with the idea of courage and also staying in the region i’m pleased to briefly hand over to asmarabhi a refugee youth representative to share a personal reflection thanks thank you so much becca for the introduction respected ladies and gentlemen honorable guests it’s an honor for me to be here and speak on the behalf of my community it’s such an important event among very special evening 2019 when i started to work as a researcher i have i remember i visited places where refugees live i visited refugee schools colleges and other places where refugees live as a refugee myself i have been very close to my people i remember i met many young refugees with passion towards education who wanted to change their destinies and become educated the part that breaks me is that there are still thousands of refugees roaming around hoping for further education but unfortunately due to displacement war poverty high expenses of higher education they cannot continue th
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Meeting the Education Needs of Displaced Children – July 2021 #UK #CANADA #ECW #UNHCR

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