Season 1 Episode 3: Retired Detective Superintendent Dennis O' Toole Part 2

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_video link="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPUbdqNQWX8"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]the public has a long-held fascination with detectives detectives see aside life the average person is never exposed to in this podcast series i catch killers with gary jublin i will be interviewing real detectives taking the audience into their world a world that is rarely seen by the public i spent 34 years as a cop for 25 of those years i was catching killers that's what i did for a living i was a homicide detective i'm no longer interviewing bad guys instead i'm interviewing detectives the guests i've selected are the cops i consider real detectives their business was catching bad guys and they were prepared to go into a world where pressure risk and sacrifice was the norm these are their stories welcome back to part two of my chat with retired detective inspector dennis o'toole today we'll be talking about the international manhunt to catch the killers of heart surgeon victor chang and the fascinating case involving the famous walters boxing family hope you enjoy my second part of the chat with dennis o'toole as homicide detectives we do a lot of murders around the state i did a murder i've done a few murders up at hunter valley and don't look over at your mate barry to defend yourself here why are you the most popular i was going to say detective but i'd take it even further you seem to be the most popular human being the hunter hunter valley i just so the listeners understand what we're talking about here when we do a murder in the hunter valley when we're based in sydney we'll we'll live up there and stay in pubs or whatever everywhere i went in the hunter valley and it was i was yeah you had obviously cleared the path before everyone said oh you're a detective do you know miles do you know moles you'd go to the bar the barman you just order a beer you wouldn't even declare who you are and they go oh do you know dennis how did you become so popular in the hunt valley oh i think you're confusing me with somebody else yeah we had um well i don't i i have no knowledge of what you're talking about you deny that allegations i don't think it was me but uh there was a murder up there of a a local identity who was really well known he was an old magician and he was known far and wide out in the coal fields and what have you and he he was brutally hacked to death up there and um detective sergeant alex pollock and myself were investigating that and probably it came about the type of people that are up there it's a it's a very closed shop a very closed community yeah yeah and um i'd never experienced this where you were talking to 18 year olds or 80 year olds and they'd say no no no don't know i said you know one of your own's been brutally murdered don't you want to we've been taught never to talk to the cops and it came back to a police shooting at rothbury at a mine at rothbury in 1929 and trying to get these people to open up and at least converse with with detectives in particular i mean local uniformed lakes probably yeah not a problem but uh to get any of them to talk to you even about one of their own and that's what i'd say look one of your own don't you want to help find the people that did this or the person that did this now we've been to it you don't talk to the cops you know and you know year blake's got a job to do that's fine but uh so we tried to go about it with a nice way and break down the barriers and go and meet them in a pub or a club or something well you left an indelible impression i i i didn't see it but i wouldn't be surprised if there was a statue of you built in valley i don't know what you did i'm not even going to ask that we don't have to go there but that's another part and like we talk about the heavy parts and the impact homicide investigation or yeah the life of the detective has but we get to see different worlds don't we like you are you're in a different world that's i'm not trying to downplay it or what have you that this is serious it's a fact of life that there are bad people out there yeah that are going to commit horrific things yeah and it's up to us to prevent that happening again it's happening yeah you can't do anything about that yeah so you've just got to do your best to make certain whoever committed that offence is not going to do it again you know put them away and protect the decent members of the community and i i i like your honesty in saying that uh when you are investigating the crime there's a bit of ego in that you don't want to be beaten i think that's a trait that detectives you've got to have some pride in what you do and it's almost a challenge if someone's been murdered and you're the person responsible for catching that person there is a challenge there such a challenge yeah as you mentioned before there's been a few challenges that i've done but again i haven't done by myself oh no no it's it's one one thing that i think people need to understand that uh policing is a team sport and yeah you'll have the captain or the person that you know is recognized for it but i fully understand as you say with the granny killer you know 70 people on that and uh yeah i've been very fortunate i've had great work mates i've had mentors i suppose you would call them senior police but you look up to that were again totally committed to what they did and you learned so much from it i um we sort of break new ground at uh i was at north sydney and i i was working my work mate there was a policewoman um she was a great person but on this particular occasion we caught a fellow there'd been an assault and we stopped this bloke in the street and he was a witness and he was telling us oh he was very helpful really nice baby so we'll take him back to the office and get a statement off him while we can when we got him back to the office and the detective's office at north sydney was distinct from the police station yeah 100 yards so we went up there late at night got him in there as on starting to talk to him all of a sudden he wasn't a witness this was the boy we were after right and he realized that that was all of a sudden he's in trouble so he jumps up he tried to make a bolt for the door yeah and he didn't yeah i've grabbed him and we're like two wildcats we're middle of the night in this deserted office and the police woman i was with raced out of the office outside to the main office and i thought oh you know yeah flash through my mind thanks for the help sort of thing what i didn't know was that she went straight to the phone call for assistance straight away and race back in and by that stage we'd knocked over tables and chairs i've got to be honest he was under the table and i'm jamming him in with a chair because he was if he got it he was on top of me at that time and uh he jumped up pulled himself from under the table he's come at me thrashing i'm thrashing and all i remember is seeing a handbag being thrown like that and i in my that instant i thought bloody handbag what good is that then i heard the thump because she had a 38 and the handbag hit him on the side of the head 38 was a pretty heavy handbag knocked him down he's lying down there and she said oh i hadn't haven't heard him and she said oh i forgot that was in there i think we've all had those moments in policing when you're actually wrestling with an offender and that seems like an out-of-body experience and i'm getting paid for this that's just especially when you're losing what about um and we won't mention his name for obvious reasons but uh i think you actually passed him on to me and my life has never been the same but i know who you will refer to him as mr x this is a prison informant uh just to give people a sense of it he be in charge of murder but i think he's been pretty well charged with everything like he's a very very extensive criminal history i met him on the investigation we won't name the investigation he kept dropping uh oh do you know miles do you know miles i go yeah yeah and so you were his point of reference i just checked with miles i'm good i'm reliable on this i think that was about 25 years ago and he still uh a prominent part in my life in fact i got a phone call from a hospital and i said why are you phoning me and they said because your downers is next of kin so i just want to publicly thank you moles for asking how would you describe him he was well i've used the word unique mr x um he was a heroin addict and he turned out to be an incredible informer yes and he was worth his weighting goal as an informant yeah and i sometimes think if i hadn't done what i've done which isn't according to oil uh they and they were in a relationship for a number of years i don't know to this day there are there are times in your policing career where you've got to make judgment calls well i made a decision yeah and those judgment calls like he's assisted me on on things one that wasn't the last time i saw him but the time before that he happened to be in jail again go figure that because that comes as a surprise to you i'm sure but i walked into jail and he's dressed in his uh prison greens and uh he came i won't say running because that's an exaggeration but came in walked up to me very fast we're in the middle of a yard and he's given me a big hug and said i love you brother and i've gone as i'm standing there cuddling this six foot four giant in prison greens in the middle of prison i said i don't think that's a good look but that's him i don't know so thank you miles i i can actually i can afford on your contact number to him if you want to renew the relationship no okay believe in the zap in the 1980s the waters family were well known across australia the three brothers dean guy and troy were all australian champion boxers trained by their father seth on the surface it looked like a successful feel-good story but following the murder of alan hall in 1988 the dark secrets of the family were revealed so people that uh haven't heard of this investigation it was um the uh waters brothers um had a fav assess uh he was a boxer and uh he trained his sons in a um well what's now been recognized as a barbaric way but they rose to become three australian champion boxers in the one family they were pretty famous at the time they were fighting for world titles and there was a murder a murder of a person by the name of alan hall up on the central coast which is sort of two hours north of sydney um a shotgun uh was it he was a shotgun do you want to just take me through your involvement than that very briefly um sesame dean had been charged with the murder of alan hall but it was beaten at the lower court and they were acquitted and it was thrown out and um anyway it didn't go away and as you know in a homicide when you do have a spear minute you go back over old murders and what have you i got the brief there and it appeared to me no doubt that they were involved they did and um there was nothing you could do could i just just to put in perspective alan hall was suspected of having an affair with cesar's partner well he wasn't suspected dude what happened uh cess had a number of horses along with 70 dogs on his property and alan hall broke in those horses he was a horse breaker yeah that makes other thing and um when he'd broken in the horses and wanted payments cis didn't have any money so sis offered him his wife yeah in payment yeah so alan hall had a sexual relationship with christine and they fell in love basically so all of a sudden he treated her totally different to how seth was sis was a brutal evil man yeah no question of that with his whole family with his sons and daughter he had a daughter which he would never acknowledge once she had left christine had left says that was it the house had been torched where they were living again no charges laid but it was pretty obvious who did it and then the shooting it's again very unusual that there was a shotgun used and a 22. damon cooper had the 22 dean had the shotgun dean killed alan walters with a blast to the chest and i've got no doubt that what uh damon did damon closed his eyes fired and alan hall had a stock whip yep and he was cracking the stock lick i mean it was actually above his head when he cracked the last time and the 22 bullet lodged in stock so he played no part in his death but um damon ended up going to jail for 14 years and being beated on diminished responsibility but it was an amazing case what says put those boys and girls through uh people i think you'd be hard-pressed to convince people what an evil bugger he was he treated them like animals the boys themselves i i think i admire them so much the whole family had how they came out of it without mental scars is beyond me um but they did and the the strange thing until the public became aware it was almost like okay he's a hard-ass father training his sons to be champions but it was verged on well didn't verge it was evil i i at one stage i interviewed his daughter and she she'd she was telling me uh things that had happened and i'm shaking my head and you know this blade do all this yeah she said well here you are she said at high school she ran in a mile race and ran second and she felt i ran second new beauty seth came and got her took her from the sports day took her home and belted her with a a rubber hose for running second next time you'll run first she went to bed that night no dinner or anything like that the following day the door opened she said i'm in bed and there's dad with a hose again she said i waited until he came up to the bed she said pretending i was asleep he looked away from instance she said i flew out of bed out the door she said over the veranda and then she got tangled in a barbed wire fence and seth was belting her in with the rubber hose you you'll never run second again and the boys ran out and pulled him off her yeah yeah dean and troy and uh i just shook the head and i'm looking and she said look and she undid the blouse and showed me the scars from the barbed wire yeah um and she said i had to get out of there which she did of course and but he did the same with dean dean was heavyweight champion of australia and he belittled being unbelievable um i could tell you stories which we can't yeah yeah family magazine yeah he was a terrible man yeah i know it's had an impact on you and anyone that that looks like a look into that world what those uh the kids paul and i uh we went up and so i said let's go and stare him up we've got a complaint here from the from the from the ex-wife yeah we'll use that as a pre-text okay so this this is after uh seth had been charged and acquitted and dean had been charged and acquitted you've had a look at it with jacob and a quiet moment in in homicide so you pick up an old case you've had a look at it and go be good for it let's run with it let's run for it so you've reached out to dean so that's where we're at and the three boys were in a room at the house told them we're coming over christine the allegations and we were sitting down uh paul and i opposite them and we spoke about christine and allegations and all this and then i just threw a curly one straight at dean i said i want to talk about alan hall yeah well you should have seen the look on dean's face yes and i asked a number of questions and he wouldn't look me in the eye he would not look at me and uh we spoke about it for a while the boys wouldn't look yep and uh i said anyway see how we go doing walked out jumped in the car jaco and i jk said he did it i've said it we'll keep on this now rang him a number of times called out and saw him a number of times he wouldn't admit it he wouldn't look me in the eye but he never once denied it and never that's very telling did he say i don't want to speak to you don't count anything else so that was in the state of limbo next thing it all went quiet and we had murders and and that was it i did something with dean i have never done to anybody outside of the police in my life i gave him my silent phone home phone number and i said look if you ever want to talk about it and i could see he wanted to yeah he just couldn't bring himself to do it i said you really anytime you're in i've never done that with anybody else and uh probably quite a few police will frown and but uh cut a long story short i got a phone call one night from melbourne he was in melbourne yeah and he'd been there for a while he told me that he was in with a bad crew and he wanted to come and see me and he said you know what i want to see you about yeah do it two days later the solicitor rang me two days after that presented himself to the detective's office at uh gosford and uh he admitted the whole thing and the from our perspective our point of view what he didn't know yeah was that we'd been working on ces for a number of months yeah we had an informant yeah he was cesar's best friend yeah and that informant was wired up right we had listening device uh license we had warrants to do it uh all legal what have you and seth was skying to this yeah acquaintance we had all that tape and what dean didn't wasn't aware of was the things he was telling us just corroborated all this stuff in the papers and anyway that it was just gold as far as we were concerned for evidence but the one thing that jumps out at me the night that alan hall was murdered the previous night they'd been practicing with a 22 firing out of cessa's lounge right yeah the window that was the night before the murder yep the night of the murder the police arrived at cesar's place because he was at the obvious suspect but seth at that time had something like 70 odd dogs there among other things and the dogs were in the house and and just to say the public fully understand what we're talking about here 70 or dogs and they'd go to the toilet in the house they'd go to the toilet in the house yes amongst other places and as the police are banging on the door and opening up cesar's looked around and seth saw a 22 shell casing on the floor yeah and uh being the cunning rat that he was he realized if that was to match with the shell casing that had been found or had been found he didn't know that but yeah there was evidence he knew that he picked it up and put it in his mouth as the police walked in the front door and what he did do was tell our informant who was wired up with the tape that the unfortunate part of that was that he picked it up with a piece of dog excretement put it into his mouth and he had to talk to the police with the 22 shell and the dog excretement under his tongue and pretended that everything was all right when we interviewed doom dean tells us the same story he said ah daddy said when they left you have to spit it out he had it in his mouth yeah of course we had that on tape some months earlier that's good corroborative evidence it was pretty good okay and i thought maybe yeah there that's right and well he didn't swallow it justice justice comes in funny ways but uh he was a truly evil man and how those boys and uh the the girls came out of it is beyond me but they're they're decent people yeah yeah no it's sad a sad situation that people have to grow up in that type of environment but full credit to them that they they've made meaningful lives when you're working on the investigation on ses did you get any information from anyone oh yes there were there were lots of people we we got uh some information through an acquaintance and bearing in mind that seth had many many acquaintances at that time especially in the boxing world and they all wanted to be his mate and what have you so it was just an acquaintance that started up with with got the information from uh we had a listening device attached that person contacted police and said he's admitted to me that he murdered right alan hall okay that he did it so that's how it is yeah it came forth on that basis the interesting uh end to that story is that dean actually uh didn't get convicted of the murder no he didn't he uh he admitted everything every part he played in it yep and uh firing the fatal shot yep but it was the diminished responsibility that the jury accepted yeah and um you've got to know the full circumstances of it he he definitely was and you're you're not uncomfortable with that decision i think he should have gone to jail and i've told dean that yes however i can totally understand how the jury came to that decision when they heard the evidence of uh how cess treated those boys and in particular uh dean yeah um bearing in mind he was the heavyweight champion of australia huge big man what have you and there's a little uh says watering around and treating him pathetically yeah and belittling him all the time i mean those boys uh and they've interviewed them all and they've looked they've cooperated and what have you yeah they never at any stage at schooling ever had kids any of their mates back from school they weren't allowed to have friends back and they were totally isolated from the rest of uh society really yeah it's it's frightening that is something that the kids can hold up horror is probably the better way than describing it we are now going to talk about the murder of victor chang in 1991. dr chang was a world-renowned heart surgeon who is pioneering heart transplants victor chang's murder shocked the world it was unbelievable that how i came about i was taking days off that they owed me from the granny murders right 45 days they owed me i can still remember the uh the number and uh i took it off and i haven't just just said the public understand i understand from uh please as in uh sometimes you work on when you're meant to be off yes and and the budget won't allow paying yeah so we get we get told the government's running out of money you can't afford it but uh if you don't come in this murderer might get away yeah so you had 45 days where you had 25 days i had worked i hadn't been paid for but i was due to take them off yes and i took a couple of days off well i think it was the first day i took and i was out fishing off box head and we only had pages in those days that was and uh paige had come in urgent the contact office urgent i'm in the middle of nowhere we didn't have mobile so you're out in the boat yeah north of sydney middle of nowhere and uh my mate that i was with he did have a little transistor radio there and we turned it on and i said mate i've got to go with so we upped the lines and we're heading back and as we're coming under the rip bridge there's a news flash that there's been a murder at mossman uh believed to be an asian man has been murdered at mossman that's all we had when i got home into my place there was a highway patrol car waiting out the front i've been fishing i've got bait and prawns no matter what's going on here you wouldn't look too good or sweet i didn't look good i didn't smell too good either so i had a quick shower jumped in so the highway patrol car was waiting at the front of your place to race you down to sydney an hour and a half away back to sydney to the murder to the murder scene so uh got to the murder scene and then it was then i said we think it's doctor victor chan couldn't and people mightn't realize but at the time his profile was extremely high that was cutting edge fiona coop the heart transplants um he was he was probably well at the time they were saying he was one of the three top hard surgeons in the world yeah and it was just you get your head around that where do we start here and contrary to what jayco and waterman talk about um look i i think i i will interrupt just short a little bit that uh contrary to what jaco and andy wore them and i think you might be referring to your uh famous infamous whatever you want to call it retirement function when uh they perhaps were attacking you a little bit unfairly i thought at the time i i wasn't they i wasn't laughing at them and it was your day and it's important that you can tell your story from your perspective how you solved personally solved the victor chang murder and i think it was either jaco or andy pointed out that the offenders actually dropped their wallet at the scene well both of them did on a number of occasions yes i did but that yeah okay that might be giving you a help in the direction but you still solved it well dopey here my first reaction was they've left it there on purpose to throw a red herring in and we're the wrong way so i that wasn't one of my better decisions and uh yeah summaries but um yes the wallet was there but that's a help and unfortunately there was a big operation as you can appreciate we formed the task force straight away what have you and an offender we had a suspect the second man um there were three involved and we'll go just on the serious note too this is probably less than 12 months after the granny killer yes you're back in mossman and you've got the whole country uh looking at you again obviously in terms of here we go again and it was it was just as bad as the granny murders with the political pressure because of the victim because he was such a world uh you know identity um it was just on and where do you start and cut a long story short we ended up we got one of the offenders and he turned turtles straight away and um yes but he'd only do it through indemnity and we managed to get intimidated we had no idea what the rest of the story was so we got the uh the story from him and by that stage we identified a the second and third person we believe we had the person down in victoria one of them the third person had flown to malaysia two hours earlier he'd were able to track down that he'd been on a flight and gone two hours earlier which unfortunately by the time we contacted the malaysian police the flight had landed and uh he'd gone into the walls of malaysia right and that doesn't stop our dogged detective dennis o'toole [Laughter] well we headed off to malaysia and courtesy of malaysian airlines we were very apprehensive i've got to say what was going to happen there we were going to a muslim country and how they operated there and how they'd receive us at the time there had been a fair bit of political bickering between the two prime ministers from australia and malaysia and we thought this is going to be good and as it turned out they met the police met us at the airport there were a group of detectives there and within two hours we were totally at ease it was if we'd traveled into state they were no different to us they operated the same as us and we were there for i think about five or six weeks and we weren't able to locate the offender but we were sure that he was still in the country all the borders have been closed and when i talk about borders i'm talking about as in stopping arms trafficking coming in from so fairly tight yeah it was tight they were very confident he was there we returned to australia put in the full reports what had taken place what was in place we had survived they had hundreds of surveillance police and uh informants operating and two weeks later i got the phone call my wife took the phone call um from the superintendent in malaysia evelyn could you tell mr dennis we have his man that was the phone call and uh then of course we had to get over there and there was still a fair bit of politics going on between canberra and and we thought we're going to lose him to be honest and anyway we made it evidence in the supreme court in malaysia and he was handed into our custody and the um you had some and i i know in in talking to yourself and uh and jacob and i'm just fascinated by life inside the malaysian jail and uh so what what you saw in there and uh yeah it's um if any of the prisoners in a new south wales or an australian job yeah you go there we we went there the first time that we went to interview phillip lem was the offender to interview philip and uh we we took the computer in and we had it was electronic we did uh electric batteries so we wanted to plug it into a power point i said well we don't have a power point here it's a huge uh prism yeah unfortunately they've been used to house australian prisons of war during the war by the japanese and whatever i don't think much had changed so we had to stop what we're doing and go to a local hardware store and buy three electric extension cords where we found a power point and had it winding through the jail so that we could interview phillip um i thought this is not a this is not a good start but as it turned out we interviewed him and extradited him and [Music] the malaysian prime minister was very very gracious and the the malaysian police i've got the utmost respect for and uh we're still in contact one uh the thing that uh when you're over there you did talk about a at night or i've heard jayco talk about the night where you went out with um let's say in australia i think that you'd call them a colorful racing identity that the local police took you out drinking with and there was someone there that seemed to have a lot of bodyguards pulled jacob and without putting too much on paul jacob gets very friendly when he's had a few drinks and i think a few drinks were had on this occasion and you relay the story where you've got four people standing around this colorful racing identity who were his bodyguards and jacob in his gregarious way when he's had a few drinks decide to cuddle them all and give them a kiss on their head and they were reaching for their firearms this colorful racing identity we uh we christened him lenny as in lenny mcpherson and uh yes it was a funny occasion it was absolutely they didn't know what to do they by the time they put their hands into their coat jacob actually grabbed them was painting a kiss on the top of their heads and yeah i don't think we should go anything okay no diplomatic incidents right no i know it was but is it is it true or is it uh fable but uh if you do travel interstate on investigations as we do in homicide quite often that the interstate police tend to look after you and that's not just look after you for the type of work that you're doing and help you around find finding the suspects or witnesses but also on the social side they'll take you out and take you out for a drink and that so when you're talking in the state and i think that translates when you go overseas to malaysia look it was exactly the same we we didn't know what to expect and as it turned out they they could have been in new south wales yeah and um even to the extent after we'd finished all the proceedings the extradition had been approved uh we were booked to go on a flight to return to sydney the following day and i can talk about it now and um there was a reception afternoon tea we only had tea and it was the malaysian prime minister and thanked us and i thanked him for the support and the cooperation of the royal malaysia police and and i happen to mention that we're flying out the next day and his response was uh nonsense um you've seen malaysia first we've shown him the language um it's hard to argue with the problem well he's the prime minister okay and uh jimmy council the tip was in charge of the task force and i tell them you're not gonna believe this boss and uh jimmy said i don't believe anything you're saying but run it past me anyway there's some funny excuses for detectives saying why they've got to start and there was also um as is because you and jake are friendly people and you invited if there was if your counterparts came to australia to visit at any time is it true the story that jk tells it at one stage a busload of people from malaysia turned up and jacob didn't recognize any of them and they're at his place and a little bit further of course we had ordered a huge uh cookout jacob done it on himself he and his charming wife debbie had prepared fried rice and they put bacon in the fried rice so an hour before this busload arrive evelyn my wife myself jacob and debbie are picking out bacon yeah for religious reasons and we didn't need to offend them but we weren't going to throw the whole lot that's all we had to eat and that was funny and that yes they were the wrong people they were friends of friends of friends we didn't know any of the people that came over you didn't even know miles and jacob manning i'm sure they had a great great time look it's you know i've been so fortunate truly i've uh yes all i can say is i loved it um anybody that joins the the police and goes into homicide for all the right reasons and they want to do that you certainly you have to put up with some horrendous scenes and and what have you and terrible human tragedy no doubt about that but to make some good you've got to you've got to be there and being committed to stopping these people doing it's going to happen yeah it's going to happen again yeah um all you can do is try and prevent it happening again by finding and putting them away and it's got to be done properly of course yeah well knowing the the career that you've had and the way that you you've turned out and the view you haven't got a slanted view on life either you you've still see the positives even seen all the negatives and full credit to you but i'm not going to get let you get away from an interview without asking you some some questions some difficult questions now you didn't tell me this is this time for official caution i'll i'll tell you when i'm going to caution you you know you're not under arrest at this stage but i'm i'm looking at that door okay i'm i'm looking at one of your partners barry killing sitting over there yeah now i'm going to ask you the hard questions who's the better detective barry or jacob no i i'm like outstanding okay yeah great i've got that that's all i want from this interview i'm going to take that and take that to jacob look miles thank you so much for your time i you entertain me every time i sit down and have a chat with you your good stories could go on forever and uh but not being recorded don't make jokes about recording it's not funny for some of us low blow light blow okay let me let me finish off a question that we uh finish off with all the guests on on the real detectives podcast there's a lot of detectives portrayed in uh fiction in books movies tv who do you most identify with fictional detective fictional yeah i think i mentioned it before i would suggest probably the one one of the most famous detectives of all in in that you know with your james bonds and all that i'll go for danny devito i reckon you have dead set nailed it i'm joking i'm sorry well you've nailed it they uh when they're talking about the grannies they were talking about the offender who would play uh some of the roles if it ever was made into a film and ronnie smith said they'd make john wayne glover it'd be ideal clinton eastwood yeah and miles danny devito well thanks moles you've taught me a lot i've worked under you um the lineage that you passed on has been passed on to me i really appreciate it and thanks for thanks for your time i understand that and mate you i'm very proud of you like everybody else it's uh abny dearly's with you mate and uh your loss to the people of new south wales i think it's pretty grievous mate i just hate that there's still some people left there that have got your attitude uh and it hasn't gone with you that's all yeah yeah what a terrible shame to end a career like yours under these surgeries yeah well we'd like to think we all leave a legacy i know you certainly haven't i'd like to think i have so you have to yeah let's hope that everything turns out all right and i wish you all the best mate beautiful okay thanks miles cheers i hope you enjoyed that as much as i did i always feel good after spending time with dennis or miles as his mates call him that's a trait that he brought to his work as a homicide detective and the reason he was successful he made people feel comfortable and they revealed things to him because of that however those that mistook his happy-go-lucky nature for weakness did so at their own peril he was strong when he needed to be and a man of true integrity one of nature's true gentlemen cheers [Music] next week on eye catch killers i'm speaking to retired detective chief inspector angelo mamala an absolute legend of the new south wales police we'll be talking to angelo about his time working in redfern during the riots also as a young detective in the armed hold-up squad his work we carried out with middle east and organized crime gangs some fascinating murder investigations and of course the leadership of the investigation into the lint cafe siege eye catch killers is published by true crime australia produced by claire harvey from the sunday telegraph and dylan adams at made in katana i'm now an investigative journalist at news corp australia attached to the sunday telegraph if you like the podcast please subscribe to our newspapers you<br><!-- wp:image {"id":1776,"sizeSlug":"large","linkDestination":"none"} -->rn<figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img class="wp-image-1776" src="https://en.videoencontexto.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Season_1_Episode_3_Retired_Detective_Superintendent_Dennis_O_Toole_Part_2_UPUbdqNQWX8.jpg" alt="Season 1 Episode 3: Retired Detective Superintendent Dennis O\' Toole Part 2" /></figure>rn<!-- /wp:image -->[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Season 1 Episode 3: Retired Detective Superintendent Dennis O' Toole Part 2

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