Taiwan & China Simple History Deep Dive

Taiwan & China Simple History Deep Dive

okay well i’d like to welcome you to a connector my name is mark foreman also known as b blues man that is my twitter handle my internet presence handle if you will my tag whatever um so anyhow let me give you a little bit of background about myself i’ve been doing this a connector podcast uh on and off for oh better part of 20 years more often on but more on and off recently and uh have a number of different themes i uh basically um here in taiwan as you can see on the screen you’re looking at a wikipedia page which is titled history of taiwan and we’ll get into that in a moment what i’m hoping to do um lately in the stock market there’s been a lot of things going on with china and overseas market chinese stocks chinese companies that have their stock listed in overseas markets and it usually involves uh an offshore um account somewhere like the cayman islands something like that and basically lately there’s been a lot of activity and so i was kind of motivated to talk a little bit about that because i think a lot of people really don’t understand or don’t have much knowledge about what is the difference between taiwan and china are these are they the same are they different how are they similar how are they different etc etc and on that note let me start it on this thread i mean as a young person prior to having a formal and academic interest in china and or taiwan to the point of wanting to study it more deeply i was always kind of confused because when i was a kid you know i heard the names china free china democratic china the republic of china the people’s republic of china formosa taiwan and thailand and knowing that all these places are in asia and i think a couple of them are either the same or are related and i don’t know did i mention communist china and red china if not i just did it again but anyhow the point being i mean it’s just very confusing so like who are we talking about who is china who is taiwan what is the relationship okay so on that note i mean we’ve got the wiki wiki page open and uh basically this is focusing on the history of taiwan which is it says here this article is about the history of the island of taiwan so it’s not uh not focusing so much on the politics but more on the physical geographic island now now taiwan island uh is basically located uh off off um of the uh of mainland china what we call mainland which is the bulk of uh chinese land now china has another big uh outer island called um hainan island and of course hong kong is also an island off off of uh china taiwan is actually probably the furthest away of any of the historical quote unquote uh chinese outer islands now there’s also some islands that are under control of taiwan or okay okay let me let me get back to people’s republic of china and and republic of china so i said formosa republic of china people’s republicans okay basically china historically was all one country which at one point included taiwan i mean in the history probably up through the qing dynasty which lasted through uh the late uh 18th century and you know but it was basically lost now what happened was at one point this is so this is the old uh uh china which was an empire okay so all the different dynasties are the names of the different uh dynastic periods of the different emperors of china so you have many like the tang dynasty and the qingdaos dimension and the qing and the uh ming and the yen i mean there’s so there’s many many different dynasties you know we’re not going to get in there right now and in each dynasty you have several different emperors in the same way japan you have different dynasties and if i’m not mistaken i think in japan is you have a new a new emperor they consider that a new dynasty so anyway uh taiwan at one point got carved away there was there was a relationship between uh japan and the northeastern area of china which is uh called manchuria and basically the japanese annexed manchuria during the qing dynasty and they set up kind of a puppet state there and the the last emperor if you know the movie the last emperor he was actually manchurian and so they set up a puppet state in manchuria and they actually called it mantuco and so then in southern china down um around well central actually central china shanghai and even further south that’s where you basically had some people like the kmt the guamingdang wanting to and they were they were basically uh following uh sunyat sen who is credited being the father of china and so he’s acknowledged by both mainland china the prc and the republic of china which is based on taiwan as being the father of china um he also happened to be an american citizen which is another interesting tidbit that maybe someday uh we’ll get on to but that’s not crucial right now key point right now is that you had japanese involvement you had basically the the nascent communist party and the nationalist party which is what the kmt stands for it stands for the nationalist party uh that they wanted to basically free china from empire imperial rule okay so think in terms of star wars i mean it’s kind of like you had the um you know you had the the jedis and those people the resistance and you had the you know the empire and darth vader and whatnot so uh in in in the minds of the nationalists and the communists you know basically the imperial china was more like you know the empire and darth vader and the emperor and those guys anyway so there’s a lot of activity going on finally there’s a revolution in 1911 and the republic of china was born and that was led like i said that was led by sunyat sen and that was the nationalist party and at that point i don’t know how active the if there was a communist party uh you know officially yet or not but basically it was it started out that way and so but at that time taiwan was under japanese control because the japanese still controlled manchuria that was not a part of china that was taken control of by the republic of china or the nationalists okay i know it’s confusing but bear with me um anyway so taiwan was still it was a japanese colony basically i think from i want to say like 18 mid 8 mid 19th century to the mid 20th century to 1949 and so and the reason i mention this is because you hear a lot of talk from mainland china or the people’s republic of china claiming how taiwan is theirs technically the people’s republic of china has never governed on taiwan taiwan has never been part of the people’s republic of china government or reign now uh they seem to think they have a claim to it based on uh you know uh previous history etc etc and of course it’s open debate so it’s a very uh complicated situation it makes it even more complicated is chiang kai-shek who was the leader of the nationalist party uh towards getting closer to world war ii the japanese were in china both the nationalists chinese and the communist chinese both wanted to get rid of the japanese and get them out of china because the japanese had committed a lot of atrocities in nanjing and uh you know basically the the chinese communists for the most part uh were uh peasants uh you know uh farmers and peasants and um you know so you know the working people more educated people uh were probably more affiliated with the nationalist party and so essentially uh they they worked together the nationalists and the communists worked together for a while to defeat the japanese to get them out of china and once they succeeded there then they started fighting between themselves and so finally uh the there was such a a a growth movement to the uh the communist party and they were just talking and convinced you know the common people look at all the injustice injustices under the nationalist party and how they’re the party of business and and actually too they they do have a background in uh one of the main main gangs in china the green gang and uh you know so more and more people were convinced uh you know to to join with the communist cause and so they ended up fighting with the nationalists and nationalists lost with kmt and john kashek and all of his kmt followers a lot of the soldiers a lot of the treasures from china a lot of the gold a lot of the artworks most of them all came to taiwan and uh so basically the whole plan from that point on so they said okay so now they were the government they were the uh the the elected or recognized government in china before the communist one and they declared china as being under the people’s republic of china okay which was the communist party ruling and then the kmt the nationalists came to taiwan and they declared okay the republic of china which was the legitimate government in china is now based on taiwan and the whole point was they were gonna wait in taiwan and regroup with the idea of taking china back so they had like two um they had two main uh points of this so they had the most of them here in taiwan and setting up a government here and taking taking the island back because they defeated when japan was defeated during world war ii then part of the deal that the roc made with the us and was to get taiwan back uh under their control so japan relinquished the control of taiwan to the republic of china and um so basically uh the rsc government also had a plan to uh they had a group of people in in burma and uh actually a lot of the people in burma well some of them probably got into the heroin cultivation and heroin trade as a means of raising and maintaining funds because whole idea was to have like a pincer so taiwan from the east and then burma uh the troops in burma from the south would would basically attack china at the same time on two different flanks and uh that never happened and so obviously the prc has been under control of the of the communist party since um like i said 1949 and uh you know to this date now but uh there’s just a whole lot of convoluted uh history and treaties and whatnot and third parties like the us and the japanese that were involved to make the matter even more complicated and jiang kaishek basically choosing to have the republic of china leave the united nations during the 70s and relinquish their seat and what and then the people’s republic republic of china came in and claimed that seat and so that that didn’t really help taiwan’s cause in terms of approving and establishing legitimacy so it’s just been a whole confusing mess uh but to make a long story short you have uh taiwan economically developed uh ahead of china uh had a good relationship with the united states uh during the vietnam war there were um uh army bases here in taiwan uh uh under the approval and permission of the republic of china government and of course uh you know one han one uh one hand washes the other uh you know the us government made uh you know did some did some things to benefit the government gave a lot of funds and helped them you know a lot of the bases the us government built and left here became uh bases uh you know for the local government etc and uh they you know they shared you know they shared some of the wealth i mean they basically paid their rent and uh they also said okay you know because you’re a good partner you’re a good ally you know we’re going to open up some trade opportunities for you in the u.s and they gave them the whole idea and the whole path forward say hey look you know you’ve been pretty much an agricultural society uh you know u.s has already got a good consumer uh economy and uh you know there’s probably an opportunity for you to provide a lot of products at competitive prices uh you know and you can do uh we’ll we’ll open up the doors and you can start trading more with the us and that’ll help your economy grow etc etc and so that was uh probably late 60s when the seeds were were sown for that and when i came here in 1987 that was just at the point of the repeal of martial law at that point zhang kai shek had already uh died his son uh jung jingua uh was a president and so he proclaimed the repeal of martial law so it was like basically the economy was booming they were already getting big into export they were becoming they opened up they they basically set their course for democracy because there was one opposition party there’s a two-party state basically the kmt who have mentioned uh so far the nationalist party and the dpp which is the democratic progressive party which was illegal okay and they were also and the reason they were legal is because they had a lot of background other members were basically uh taiwan independence uh minded and so that was uh not not accepted by uh the republic of china nationalist party nor is it uh nor is it accepted or approved upon uh by the people’s republic of china so that’ll kind of give you a little bit background hopefully make a little bit more sense so you can see see on the page let’s get back to some of the history so it says uh the island of taiwan dates back tens of thousands of years the earliest known evidence of human habitation now here’s where it gets interesting because if you’re an american or north american a lot of the history of north america you’re going to see some of the same names here this the same uh the usual suspects so the sudden appearance of a culture based on agriculture around 3000 bc is believed to reflect the arrival of the ancestors of today’s taiwanese indigenous peoples okay so you can see the taiwan indigenous peoples formosan people or call them austronesian basically these people and all the people or the south uh see islander people people in hawaii and for that matter more than likely the the first nations people of canada the inuit of alaska uh the nato the native americans or erroneously named indian people american indian people of uh north central and south america are all related and basically started out here in asia okay so then we get uh colonization by the dutch in the 17th century good old dutch i’m from brooklyn new york which used to be a dutch colony a lot of you don’t know maybe that new york used to be new amsterdam so lo and behold the dutch were active not only coming to the west of europe going to america but also coming over to asia they were very active in indonesia and malaysia even far down in uh southern africa et cetera et cetera so this is it was followed by an influx of hokulea people now hokulo is the um there’s many dialects of chinese languages a lot of different chinese languages so in the local language of the taiwan people hokule just means that the people from uh southern fujian where most of them are from uh from and so southern fujian is basically right across from taiwan on the coast of mainland china the areas like shaman and uh there’s islands that are uh jinman and mazu they’re very close to there and fujo is kind of like the northern end of uh fujian province but that they speak a little different language anyway so also you have some hakka immigrants now haka is another subculture another subgroup of chinese people originally probably coming from central china but they immigrated down south and it literally means guest people they tend to in a lot of ways a lot of people refer to them as kind of the jews of the chinese they tend to be minorities but they often are uh discriminated against and and uh uh so they’re very clannish and they tend to uh be good at collecting political power and working together and uh so that’s it and the body of water between taiwan and china is called the taiwan street or the street of taiwan now before i go on the main reason why does china want taiwan so badly it’s not for love of taiwan’s people or feeling that there’s some sense of nostalgia oh it’s so good if china and taiwan are back together again it’s basically geopolitical the location taiwan general macarthur said that taiwan is just a permanent aircraft carrier sitting there right in the uh north china sea and so basically any ship activity from southeast asia or coming even from india around and up through southeast asia is going to pass right right by taiwan uh and so like japan needing any resources from down south it’s going to come right past taiwan so it’s a very very very strategic location and that’s why all the heightened interest uh and driving the rhetoric and their stubborn insistence that taiwan belongs to them and that they’re dead set on reuniting uh taiwan and china and i’m not saying that i’m opposed or or or in favor i’m just giving i’m just giving the facts and anyway so that’s kind of what the situation is two entirely different governments two entirely different systems taiwan is really really very democratic um i mean so much so that you know sometimes people here will joke almost too democratic because there’s just so many differing opinions that are freely shared and um you know the taiwanese and the chinese for that matter too they have a lot of you know go-getter kind of attitude uh kind of like you know they’re very industrious and they’re very crafty uh you know so if they have a little bit of opportunity they’re gonna do their best to make that into a big opportunity and some of them have been very successful some of the companies you probably know well like taiwan taiwan semiconductor and foxconn and giant bicycle and for them i’ll say nvidia although nvidia i believe is incorporated as u.s corporation but it’s ceo who’s really a rock star jensen huang he’s from here uh so many people uh in the high-tech business uh uh you know are from here or the children of people that came from here like steve chen that started uh youtube uh perry chen that was one of the founders of kickstarter um a guy that recently uh passed away the guy that start well he didn’t start but he basically grew uh uh um not skechers when i said zappos and uh you know i’ve talked to him a number of times i’m just trying to think of his name it’ll come to me in a minute uh but he passed away um last year i mean i mean there’s there’s a lot so there’s a lot of well-known uh high-tech companies uh you know foxconn is like the major oem for apple and other other computer and tech technological hardware companies etc okay so i think that gives you some background and could probably help a little bit and we’ll continue to talk to this about this over a period of time um and uh it should be uh a little bit more clear i will put the link to this wikipedia page uh in the show notes so you could come and come and look at it on your own when you have time but now where i want to go before we conclude for today i don’t want to you know overwhelm you too much information um what i want to do is i want to use okay i should mention that uh i i’m going to talk about a security product that that i invest in it’s a it’s an etf uh an exchange transfer transfer fund and it’s called ewt which is a fund by isher which is part of blackrock and but i’m not a professional advisor i’m not giving any recommendations on investing or not investing i’m sharing this information purely for the sake of information uh and entertainment and education and that’s that but i just want you to know that i am invested in that and i’m going to use that as a lens and why i’m going to do that is because in in this etf and i didn’t i don’t have it open right now um but basically it’s got the majority of the major industrial uh powers companies names uh here in taiwan including taiwan uh semiconductor cleaning fog including all the ones i’ve mentioned and haven’t jungxing tire which makes maxis an acer and formosa chemical uh you know and on and on and on and we’ll get to that what i’d like to do is i’d like to talk about that and i’d like to talk about the individual companies within that bundle within that portfolio because i think it would give some better understanding and i’d like to highlight a little bit because like i said it’s just so confusing to most people taiwan china isn’t it all the same and you know and certainly for investments i think you know taiwan and the taiwanese companies are much more uh followers of the rule of law model uh i think it’s a lot less uh mercurial uh a lot more um stable if you will uh a lot more like probably the us in in some ways and hopefully some of the good ways and probably also to some of the bad ways and you can you can decide whatever that means but anyway uh i hope to uh enlighten a little bit and uh want to mention too that uh one of the uh well the sponsor of uh these casts or one of the sponsors uh is my company which is um marlin and sons and we’re involved we we do um uh basically uh market uh market assistance for companies that want to develop their brand uh their uh branded products here in taiwan or looking for uh partners here to do that and also we provide technical sourcing services and due diligence services for companies that want to purchase from here or do strategic do technical products here we have a lot of experience in doing that when i first came here one of the first jobs i had was for an american fishing rod company that was doing a lot of composite material uh composite fiber fishing poles and golf shafts and so i was working in there and they also did their own hardware for the fishing and i was working there in effect this is before this is like when computerization was just getting going let’s say it was like 1998ish no i’m sorry 1988ish so i’m i was an expediter and i’m supposed to be tracking over 400 something no there’s about 800 different skus stock keeping units in that factory no barcode system no rfid the computer prints outs i got if if they were quick they were probably four or five days old so things had already moved you know something i’m trying to track down that was said oh this was in whatever department could have easily moved to another department so it was like it was a fascinating time and a lot of it in in a very daunting way chinese have a saying may you live dur may you live in interesting times which is really kind of a curse because in their view interesting means like you know a big headache means like a lot of you know crazy stuff is going on it was pretty crazy but it was a great experience it was my first uh ever experience working in a factory it opened up my eyes a lot and realizing how much quality stuff was made in taiwan and i never realized that before because it was always in small letters small words like made in taiwan and fine print and these were like big branded u.s companies like wilson sporting goods and spalding and berkeley and fenwick the two uh there were two brands of the company i was working for etc etc so that’s where i started out and so i had a lot of experience that was my first experience too and i was fascinated with composite fiber carbon fiber fiberglass resin injected plastic and then later precision metals so have a lot of background in that and so yeah we’re still very much involved in providing those services and like i said uh we’re not a trading company and we’re not just looking oh you know you want this so let’s say you know i’ll find that and i’ll add three cents to it and sell it back to you you know we’re much more strategic and we’re much more or the value that we add is definitely in the relationships that we have in the relationships we build and the quality standard of the people that we work with because that’s really you know some of the key factors you don’t want to be changing suppliers you know willy-nilly especially in these times with all the complexities resulting from the pandemic and the mess in the supply chain and shipping etc so didn’t want to make that a long ad about my business but just kind of give you a little bit of background and so you know it is germain so we’re very very much uh involved with um you know companies here and i’ve got some friends that will join as guests from time to time we’ll be doing some different episodes uh with people from some of these companies and some of the bigger companies as well to give some more uh insight into their company new products new technologies uh and uh you know etc so i hope that’s interesting to you i will keep you updated and uh for the time being i think we’ll just call it a day so this is mark saying thank you appreciate your time i’ll let your friends know please subscribe hit the like button you know i have to get in the habit yeah hit that like button subscribe all that good stuff i mean basically just so i just kind of get on the radar over there on youtube and it helps you remember it helps other people find it and it just uh yeah it’s a good thing to do so on that note i’m going to say thank you and call it a day for now and i will be back soon so cheers bye
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Taiwan & China Simple History Deep Dive

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