US Economic History – Land (Part 2)

US Economic History – Land (Part 2)

all right so in the north you have this transition to private property which leads to these like small scale family farms um where the farm is owned um by the household and they grow crops basically for themselves and a little bit for market now the south is as we know a um different um story okay and so you know initially slavery is legal throughout the colonies um but there’s really no use for it um in the north as an institution in that you know we have small scale family farms where the people are working the fields um essentially by themselves um and it’s just there’s no there’s no there’s no economic imperative for slavery um and in throughout the new world throughout the americas you know it’s really in the sugar colonies where you you see um you see that you see slavery being uh used um it’s your southern farms that eventually develop into economies of scale where there’s like these large-scale plantations where they can essentially their output goes up exponentially as they add more labor and so it’s really depends on the type of crop and so you can see again the initial endowment shaping the institutions where georgia really begins as a free state um but the settlers slowly adopt slavery as their plantations grow uh grow larger all right and so we have these these kind of large-scale crops tobacco rice indigo with with large uh farms and as as we as we’ve covered before these are the prosperous colonies in terms of um these are the farms that are that people are growing wealthy off of so your plantation owners are your initial elites in uh in the america what would become the uh what would become the united states of america um and so and they’re also populous okay so they have like half the population now this later reverses but initially these are where you have your large-scale plantations your rich plantation owners um and they’re using economies of scale uh in in light in in agriculture okay so these are all more efficient you can’t really do small-scale farming here you can’t do like your own little tobacco farm or your own little rice farm whereas in the north you’re primarily growing wheat um which can be done at the household level so really in the endowments are determining the type of farm whether it’s small or large and then that in turn informs whether the settlers used slavery um or not so you have these initial two differences between the north and the south that we’ve kind of covered previously and then of course the u.s really increases in size with the louisiana purchase um and then so here you have the territory territorial acquisitions so here we have essentially this is bought from france texas joins here you have the mexican-american war adds this and then this um is added in 1846 from the british okay of course all this land is uh essentially taken from the indigenous uh population now when this land is added the question is what are we going to do with with all this uh this land in terms of how you know who gets it you know who who has the right uh to this land as we’ve covered in many um in many latin american countries essentially the land is seeded to the existing elites there’s a small group of elites and they just acquire large-scale uh land holdings you know when when the interior is added um to the country this happens in mexico this happens in uh argentina um as well so this one question is like who gets the land how are we gonna decide like who who owns this land and then the second question is essentially okay once this land’s added what’s going to be the political organization um are there going to be their own states are they going to be added to the existing states okay um and so those are sort of the decisions that need to be made all right i’m going to take a break here before we go into the move westward
rn

US Economic History - Land (Part 2)

rn

Share this post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *