Will The South China Sea Become China’s South Sea?

Will The South China Sea Become China’s South Sea?

Hi everyone, welcome to Difference Framesnthe World, an independent channel to find a real China. Today, we want to talk about the South ChinanSea, where Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and other countries in the area claim their rights,nand many nations outside the area, like the US, the UK, Japan, and Australia, want tonsafeguard navigation freedom. China is the most significant player. It hasnlong been criticized for its 9 dash line that includes all disputable islands in its sovereignty.nAnother critical player in the region is the United States, which treats every corner ofnthe earth as its backyard. China claims to own all islands in the SouthnChina Sea. Since the Han Dynasty, successive Chinese governments have exercised continuousnand effective sovereign jurisdiction over the Spratly Islands by establishing politicalndistricts, naming islands, and declaring sovereignty. During the Second World War, Japan invadednand occupied most of China, including the Spratly Islands. The Cairo Declaration andnthe Potsdam Proclamation, and other international documents clearly stipulated the return ofnChinese territories stolen by Japan back to China, which naturally included the Islandsnin the South China Sea. In December 1946, the Chinese government appointednsenior officials to the Spratly Islands and held a celebration ceremony, erected a monumentnto commemorate the event, and stationed troops. In 1952, the Japanese government formallynrenounced all rights and claims to Taiwan, the Penghu Islands, the Spratly Islands andnthe Western Islands” and formally handed them back to China. For a considerable period after world warntwo, there was no so-called Spratly Islands dispute. No country in the South China Seanregion had ever disputed China’s sovereignty over the Spratly Islands and their nearbynwaters. Vietnam explicitly recognized China’s territorial sovereignty over the Spratly Islandsnbefore 1975. Countries such as the Philippines and Malaysia did not have any legal documentsnor speeches by their leaders before the 1970s that mentioned their territorial boundariesnincluded the Spratly Islands. The Treaty of Paris in 1898 and the Treaty of Washingtonnin 1900 between the United States and Spain clearly defined the territorial limits ofnthe Philippines without the Spratly Islands. Resolutions of many governments and internationalnconferences have recognized the Spratly Islands as Chinese territory. Many countries havenpublished maps indicating that the Spratly Islands belong to China. The dispute overnthe sovereignty of the Spratlys began in the second half of the 20th century. Since then1960s, some neighbouring countries have occupied the exposed islands and waters of the SouthnChina Sea. The so-called “sovereignty” claims and the division of the waters were made bynVietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Brunei, among others. The dispute over the sovereigntynof the islands and reefs in the South China Sea and the jurisdiction of some of the seanareas has been formed by six countries and seven parties. In addition to the 9 islandsnand reefs occupied by China Mainland and Taiwan, 28 islands and reefs have been occupied bynVietnam, 7 by the Philippines, 3 by Malaysia, 2 by Indonesia and 1 by Brunei. The South China Sea dispute can date backnto the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea that was formally signed by 158ncountries in 1982. The convention was a result of three UN meetings in 1958, 1960 and 1973.nThe third round of negotiations took 9 years, from 1973 to 1982. The convention helped countries solve disputesnpeacefully and avoid military conflicts, like that war between China and Vietnam in thennineteen seventies. Many people know about the war between Vietnamnand China in 1979, but the battle in the western islands between the two countries was notnthat famous. At that time, the US had not retreated from Saigon. The Chinese navy was much weaker than SouthnVietnam, backed by the US in 1974, when Chairman Mao decided to drive the Vietnamese navy fromnthe islands it occupied. Since August 1973, South Vietnamese warshipsnhad been sailing in China’s western waters, constantly driving and arresting Chinese fishermennand occupying the islands. In September 1973, the South Vietnamese authorities illegallynand unreasonably announced that more than 10 islands in the Spratly Islands, includingnNam Wai and Taiping, would be included in South Vietnamese territory. At that time, mainland China was in politicalnturmoil, the cultural revolution. Its primary focus was to prevent the former Soviet Unionnfrom threatening the north, so it did not pay much attention to its South China SeanFleet. The original fleet of four-thousand-ton frigates was in poor condition and unablento go to sea. Only a few one-hundred-ton ships, submarines and minesweepers could reach thenwaters of Western Islands, more than 300 kilometres away from the base on its Hainan Island. Innaddition, the PLA air force was not strong, with poor air raid capability and coverage. Interestingly, the Chinese navy won and recoverednthe islands from the Vietnamese. It is worth mentioning that Taiwan did notnstop the Chinese navy from passing the Taiwan Strait, meaning Taiwan’s Chiang Kai-Shek alsonwanted to safeguard China’s sovereignty. We need to say mister Chiang Kai-Shek was a patriot,nand he declined the requests from the US to separate Taiwan from China. We believe thenChinese people will recognize his achievements when Taiwan is reunited with China Mainland. Let us go back to our topic, since when thenSouth China Sea dispute started. The first UN meeting in 1958 should be thendirect cause. It reminded all countries of the importance of islands. The exclusive economicnzone of 200 nautical miles is what countries are in pursuit of. The E E Z, or exclusive economic zone, isnthe sea area that does not exceed 200 nautical miles [370.4 km] from the territorial seanbaseline, excluding points closer to another country. The concept initially originatednin a dispute over fishing rights, and its introduction became more urgent after 1945nas submarine oil exploration became more prevalent. The countries belonging to the exclusive economicnzone have the right to explore, exploit, use, conserve, and manage the natural resourcesnof the seabed and subsoil and the waters overlying them. They also have the right to constructnand use specific facilities, conduct scientific research, etc. According to international law, other countriesncontinue to enjoy the freedom of navigation and overflight and other uses related to thesenfreedoms. The South China Sea is one of the significantnsedimentary regions globally. There are 37 known sedimentary basins with geological conditionsnfor gathering oil and gas, with about 50 million hectares, 6 times the oil-producing areasnin the North Sea Western Europe. It is the largest marine oil and gas storage area innChina, with proven oil reserves of 640 million tons and natural gas reserves of 980 billionncubic meters. The oil reserves of all the basins, includingnthose not found in the whole South China Sea, are estimated to be 23 to 30 billion tons.nAt least 250 oil and gas fields can be found under the South China Sea, 12 of which maynbecome large oil and gas fields, with total proven recoverable oil reserves of 20 billionntons and natural gas reserves of about 4 trillion cubic meters, making it one of the four largestnundersea oil storage areas in the world. The seabed of the South China Sea contains a largenamount of flammable ice, with resources of about 19.4 billion tons of oil equivalent. As early as the 1970s, humans were able tondrill 4,000 meters deep into the seabed, and it was feasible at that time to exploit thenenergies in the South China Sea. In addition to the minerals, oil, gas andnother resources, fishing is another reason for related countries to control islands andnclaim their rights. Since the Han Dynasty two thousand years ago,nChina has named the islands in the South China Sea and no other countries challenged China’snclaims. In the nineteen sixties, however, many countries began to challenge China’sn9 dash line. China’s claim to those islands derived fromnthe Republic of China, which included all islands in the South China Sea in the mapnit published in 1948. China has the right to the South China Seanlegally and historically. No other country, including the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia,nor Indonesia, ever denied it before controlling some islands stealthily. The Chinese navy was negligible in the lastncentury, and that is why the United States’ seventh fleet could stop China from recoveringnTaiwan in the past 70 years. Historically, no country took the Chinese navy seriouslynsince the Japanese defeated the Qing Dynasty’s Beiyang Fleet in 1894. As China did not have enough warships to protectnthose islands and reefs, most of the islands were taken by other countries, especiallynVietnam and the Philippines. In recent years, the Chinese have deployednmore and more warships and aircraft carriers, and they have even produced some islands outnof reefs. A new city called Sansha was established to manage the waters and islands in the SouthnChina Sea. Many people criticize China for its greed,nsaying it is unbelievable for China to possess those islands, as Beijing is thousands ofnmiles away from the South China Sea. The problem is not about proximity, however.nIf the distance matters, Alaska should be part of Canada, and Hawaii should not be anpart of the US. And interestingly, the US vice President Harrisncriticized China for bullying other countries when she visited Vietnam, where the US troopsnkilled hundreds of thousands of people between 1955 and 1975. Because the US army used bioweaponsnforbidden by the United Nations, nearly 5 million Vietnamese people have suffered fromnthem till today. US airplanes and warships in the South ChinanSea for safeguarding navigation freedom support those countries opposing China. On August 27, 2021, the US media reportednHarris boarded the US Littoral Combat Ship in Vietnam, and she emphasized the “importance”nof this battleship. She believes that this battleship could bring many benefits to thenUnited States and protect the United States in the Indo-Pacific region. Once she finished speaking, the American medianand some foreign experts chuckled. They ridiculed Harris, and the reason was straightforward:nthat Littoral Combat Ship does not deserve the “high honour” given by Harris! Most ofnthose littoral combat ships are nearing their limits and retiring, and the one she boardednalready malfunctioned multiple times. It is said that where the resources are, wherenthe US troops go. Unfortunately, the United States can not deploy enough capable warshipsnto sensitive areas now. It wants to focus all resources on China, but most resourcesnare from its allies unwilling to confront China directly. With China’s quick rise, both economic andnmilitary, the South China Sea might become China’s south sea someday, unless the UnitednStates and its allies defeat the Chinese navy and air force once and for all. If it happened,nthere would be a nuclear war worldwide doomed to destroy the human race. Please share your opinions with other viewersnwhether you agree with our comments or not. As always, your criticism and correctionsnare welcome, and we are willing to rectify them. Thank you so much for your time on this video.nIf you like our videos, please subscribe to our channel, and share them with people younknow. We publish videos daily and post long videosnon topics viewers are interested in once or twice a week. If you want to support us, pleasenuse the PayPal or Patreon link below.
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Will The South China Sea Become China\'s South Sea?

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